BREAKING: Fired sex pests named

BREAKING: Fired sex pests named

Dr Last Moyo pictured at a Wits event last year. Photo: Dinesh Balliah.

Fired! Dr Last Moyo pictured at a Wits event last year. Photo: Dinesh Balliah.

by SHANDUKANI MULAUDZI and PRELENE SINGH

Two of the four Wits University lecturers accused of sexual harassment have been dismissed.

Although the statement did not name the lecturers, Wits Vuvuzela has learned that the dismissed lecturers are Tsepo wa Mamatu and Last Moyo.

According to a statement  released today by Wits vice chancellor, Prof Adam Habib, “the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, has just dismissed two employees who have been found guilty of sexual harassment.”

Habib declined to name the individuals.

Habib said that  the hearing was conducted and chaired by independent senior counsel who submitted the guilty verdict to Wits University.

Both of these lecturers were found to be in breach of the University’s Sexual Harassment Policy, Relationship Guidelines and the University’s Code of Conduct.

“The staff members have been found guilty of sexual harassment and misconduct, and one of them has also been found guilty of sexual/indecent assault,” said Habib.

Habib apologised to all students who had been victimised by theses lecturers and added that the university would not tolerate any future incidents of sexual harassment.

The cases of the remaining two suspended lecturers are ongoing and these outcomes will be announced over the next couple of weeks.

Tsepo wa Mamatu, a lecturer in Drama has also been fired from Wits for sexual harassment.  Photo: Provided

Tsepo wa Mamatu, a lecturer in Drama has also been fired from Wits for sexual harassment.
Photo: Provided

As previously reported by Wits Vuvuzela, the university was conducting two inquiries and it is said that the campus-wide inquiry “is expected to be completed in the next two weeks”.

This inquiry is being led by the Head of the Centre of Applied Legal Studies, Professor Bonita Meyersfeld and Joe Mothibi from Norton Rose Fulbright.

Read more in the Wits Vuvuzela print edition or online this Friday.

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National Science Week: Applied Maths solves 200 year old astronomy riddle

National Science Week: Applied Maths solves 200 year old astronomy riddle

Wits science students Zwane Sicelukwanda, Edwin Mokoena and Ntomfuthi Khumalo talk to Vuvuzela about their experiences of the astronomy talk. Photo: Nolwazi Mjwara

Wits science students Zwane Sicelukwanda, Edwin Mokoena and Ntomfuthi Khumalo talk to Wits Vuvuzela about their experiences of the astronomy talk. Photo: Nolwazi Mjwara

THE discovery of a massive collision of galaxies in space, a complex and massive astronomical riddle was made simple by Witsies.

This was all revealed at an astronomy talk chaired by Director of the Cosmic Dust Laboratory Prof David Block, at the new Wits science stadium on Monday night.

The talk was part of National Science Week hosted by Wits University all week to put the spotlight on science and technology research.

“No other team of astronomers had discovered this [collisions of galaxies]. This happened on our door step. Wits Applied Maths solved the riddle, solving a 200 year old riddle,” Block said.

School pupils and university students were part of the audience and were treated to graphical images of galaxies, space and years of research conducted by the Wits science team.

Block said the challenge was making people interested in science, as he is involved in an astronomy outreach programme which brings “1000 students” to Wits.

He also extended an invitation to Wits vice chancellor Prof Adam Habib to address people at astronomy talks.

[pullquote align=”right”]”There is now a paradigm shift in sciences and it’s amazing to learn new things.”[/pullquote]

Bavukile Dlamini, 3rd year mechanical engineering, said he was inspired by the astronomy talk and that Wits was at the forefront of astronomical research.

“It was very interesting and informative. There is now a paradigm shift in sciences and it’s amazing to learn new things,” Dlamini told Wits Vuvuzela.

While Zwane Sicelukwanda, 1st year BSC computational and applied mathematics urged young people to be involved in sciences as the industry has a lot of “old people”.

Through his astronomical research career, Block met renowned physicist Stephen Hawking and former president Nelson Mandela and joked that “UJ [University of Johannesburg] was not there”.

The Wits Science week runs from July 29 to August 2.

 

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[GALLERY] Taiwanese student ambassadors visit Wits University

Six students from a Taiwan university came to South Africa as apart of a culture exchange programme. They were chosen from a long process of entries through a competition and are one of 35 teams who do this around the world.

They visit many locations while in South Africa and yesterday they visited Wits University. The event started off in Hofmeyer House in the morning where students from the university met the Taiwan students and immersed themselves in the Chinese culture by painting their faces in a symbol which representative this.

Students from both universities mingled and play games in order to get to know each other further.

Afterwards everyone met at the Wits Amphitheater where the Taiwanese students put on a show which included song and dance.

Watch a video of the event below:

 

Without training students are ‘wasted potential’

Without training students are ‘wasted potential’

 

Martin Moshal addresses executives to be a part of the Moshal Scholarship Program at the Radisson Blu Hotel. Photo: Caro Malherbe

Martin Moshal addresses executives to be a part of the Moshal Scholarship Program at the Radisson Blu Hotel. Photo: Caro Malherbe

The Moshal Scholarship Program invests in individuals who could end up mopping floors if they are not given opportunities.

The program that started in 2010, by Martin Moshal, seeks out exceptional individuals who have the potential to succeed.

“Potential is being wasted because they are too busy mopping up floors instead of mopping up the country,” said Moshal, when he addressed a group of executives at a conference at the Radisson Blu on Friday.

Selina Thebede is a UJ Business Science student. She majored in finance, economics, accounting and information-systems and is now a graduate of the Moshal Scholarship Program.

Before she was awarded the scholarship she found herself being uncertain of where she would end up. She did not think tertiary education was even an option.

Thebede overcame a lot in her life and now gives back to society by being actively involved in charities and using what she has learnt to be an example to others.

Like Thebede, 400 other students from Israel and South Africa have been given the opportunity to be properly educated because of the Moshal Scholarship Program.

“The way scholar selections take place is rather unique. Not only do we take academics into account, we also look for students with dogged determination to better themselves and their communities,” said Kate Kuper, Moshal president.

“In Jadish, the word for luck is ‘muzzle’,” said Moshal. .

“Most people who are successful got to where they are because of luck. This program is aimed at giving students from disadvantaged backgrounds a bit of ‘muzzle’ by creating opportunities for success”, he said.

The conference was to create corporate partnerships with top businesses in the country that will give Moshal students the opportunity to build networks, receive mentoring, internship possibilities and financial support.

Professor Jonathan Jansen from the University of the Free State spoke about the “graduate of the future”. His body language grabbed the audience’s attention, as he knocked over a bottle of water from the table while flinging his arms around in explanation.

Jansen said: “The pool of well-trained graduates will be small.” Receiving education is just half of what is needed to be successful. The other half is practical training in the working world, something that one does not get from at university.

The program is offered to students at all main South African universities, including Wits.

The conference room was made up of representatives from companies such as Investec, IQ Business, The National Treasury and a few major South African banks. As well as university and oil and mining companies such as Sasol and Anglo American delegates, just to name a few.

Corporate partners will follow students throughout their studies as potential future employees.

Gareth Cliff is one of the directors and partners of One on One Productions. This company has joined the program to train students in additional skills such as presentation, etiquette, body language and general dispositions- practical skills which are often overlooked as being necessary to find a job.

Jansen said he believed the program is beneficial because the time students spend getting a degree, being educated and training in the working world all “come together in a beautiful way”.

La Bonne Vie

La Bonne Vie

LE GOOD LIFE: Samkele Kaase and Karabo Ntshweng having fun in studio. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

LE GOOD LIFE: Samkele Kaase and Karabo Ntshweng having fun in studio. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

Two great minds and voices have come together to bring Witsies and all those in Braamfie ‘the good life’ on VoWfm.

La Bonne what?

[pullquote]”We want to expose Joburg in its entirety”[/pullquote] La Bonne Vie is the French phrase for ‘good life’ and is now the name of a lifestyle and entertainment show hosted by Karabo Ntshweng and Samkele Kaase.

“We want to expose Joburg in its entirety,” said Ntshweng. She added that they want to give students a taste of the good life that falls within their budget.

Kaase and Ntshweng said that they went about doing this by attending events, informing people about events and having weekly give-aways. Events and places that students previously might not have had access to or just didn’t know about.

Kaase said that they connect with the people who own all the hotspots in Braam and make their proposals for deals and give-aways for the show.

Who’s it for?

Kaase said: “The show is very androgynous. People often assume that lifestyle shows are for women.” The pair added that they are about reaching out to students in the Braamfontein area who want to make things happen for themselves.

Natural progression

The co-hosts have always wanted to work together and this show was the natural progression of their professional relationship. Ntshweng said that they have both been at VoW for a long time and that they wanted to host an “entertaining talk show” that did more than just play popular music.

Kaase is still a student at Wits and Ntshweng now works at a popular Johannesburg radio station.

Witsies can catch La Bonne Vie on Thursdays at 7pm and podcasts are going to be available on VoW’s website from this week onwards.