Q&A with Busisiwe Mkhumbuzi

Activist Busisiwe Mkhumbuzi has been thrust into the international spotlight once again after hosting the 16th Annual Nelson Mandela Lecture held last Tuesday, July 17. Mkhumbuzi started the South African chapter of the international feminist organization, V-Girls, hosted a TEDxWomen talk at the age of 16, played an active role in the UCT Rhodes Must Fall and Fess Must Fall protests, and founded the social enterprise initiative, Tshimong.

(more…)

Wits students initiate two day health fair

 

Health fair: Wits students visit health stations in numbers. Photo:           Londell Phumi Ramalepe

Wits health science students hosted a two day health fair on July 20 and 21 at Solomon Mahlangu House Concourse to raise awareness about health issues faced by students.

The students offered a number of healthcare checks including dentistry, dermatology, eye testing and physiotherapy.

The event which was hosted by Jesus Christ To All Languages (JTL) society together with the Wits Campus Health and Wellness Centre (CHWC) also provided services related to specific men’s and women’s health issues along with dietary and chronic conditions.

Participants were also able to donate blood and make use of aerobic and resistance training stalls.

Final year Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery student, and leader of the JTL society, Hennah Mungure, said that convenience plays a major role in people checking up on their well-being. The 24-year-old told Wits Vuvuzela, “Students have many questions about health issues but do not necessarily go to the doctor to find out or get answers.”

The acting head nurse of CHWC, Sister Maggie Moloi, told Wits Vuvuzela that male healthcare was one of the priorities at the fair. The CHWC have partnered with Wise Up, an operation which focuses on Voluntary Male Medical Circumcision (VMMC).

Dr Lubwana J. Kigozi from the VMMC project, who was also present at the fair, said that the aim of his organisation is to ensure that males are given knowledge about their medical healthcare so that they can voluntarily go for circumcision which is shown to reduce the “risks of acquiring HIV by 60%,” in males.

The high cost of health is one of the factors preventing students from getting regular health checks. “The only option left for students is to go to the public sector which can be a tedious process because you cannot wait an entire day when suffering from sinusitis,” said Mungure.

“Some of us do not have enough money to go to campus health, so this fair makes it easier,” said Dimakatso Hlahlu, a Wits second year geology student.

“I wouldn’t necessarily go to the doctor to check up on my health because the medical aid does not pay the full amount and I would have to top up,” said Yenzokuhle Hleta, a second year Wits mechanical engineering student.

Moloi added that ignorance also prevents students from thinking about their health. “Students tell themselves that they are only here to study and don’t have to look after their health. In the long run they end up with high blood pressure with the stress they get from studies,” Moloi said.

RELATED ARTICLES:

Q&A: Motivational speaker Arshad Suliman

ARSHAD Suliman is a keen young minded individual who hopes to change the lives of people through his own struggles. At the age of 21 and whilst still a student, he recently started up his own life coaching company, Guided Success, which aims to help people get on track with their lives through motivational speaking, individual life coaching sessions and digital product releases. He is currently in the second year of his BA degree majoring in Psychology and Philosophy.

(more…)

Q&A: Radio Host Keletso Modiba

Keletso Modiba appears to be following in her father’s footsteps, the late radio host Eddie Zondi. She recently joined the VOWFM team, co-hosting the lunch show with Ferrah Mante. She is currently in the final year of her BA degree and plans to major in media studies and anthropology.

  1. Have you always wanted to be on radio?

 

I only realised that I wanted to become a radio personality when I was in Grade 11. We were assigned for career shadowing and I chose to go to 5FM at the SABC. I shadowed DJ Fresh and through his guidance and seeing the passion he has for his job, I knew that this is what I wanted to do. I didn’t shadow my father because I wanted to make him proud by taking the initiative to educate myself without him.

 

  1. Was following in your father’s footsteps part of the reason you chose to join VOW?

 

My father was instrumental in my decision to become a radio presenter. He once told me that I should not be afraid to start from the bottom because it’s was the honorable way to succeed. Naturally, starting off at a campus radio station like VOWFM is the best example of ‘starting from the bottom’, it will help sharpen my craft and reach for my goals.

 

  1. How has your father’s legacy influenced your experience on radio?

 

I do not really express or engage in a lot of conversation about my father’s legacy. Many people loved him and remind from time to time that he was a legend. He had the ability to make people fall in love. Generally, people who are close to me and have witnessed my growth in radio remind me that he would be exceptionally proud of me. Most times, I avoid speaking about him because I fear that it would put me in his shadow. We’re two completely different brands with different target markets. It may put a lot of pressure on me in terms of expectations and so forth. I am Lula Odiba first before I am Eddie Zondi’s daughter.

 

  1. How has joining VOW affected your performance academically?

 

It hasn’t really affected my performance academically. My mom made it clear that studies come first. In my first and second years at Wits I did a show called ‘The Ultimate Hookup’ which aired from 9pm to midnight. It was the only time I had to be on air because I had to focus on my academics. Now that I’m in final year, I can work with my time a lot better. I only have my majors now so fortunately it allows me to host ‘That Lunch Show’ from 12pm to 3pm on weekdays.

 

  1. What can we expect from you in the future?

 

I believe in pacing myself and being honest with myself. Once I am ready, which is very soon, I wish to be on commercial radio stations and television doing what I love the most and actually getting paid for it.

RELATED ARTICLES:

Q&A: Radio DJ Gaopalelwe Phalaetsile

A journalist at one of Johannesburg’s biggest radio stations Jacaranda FM, this former Witsie from Moruleng in the North West is making a name for herself in South African journalism. Phalaetsile graduated with a BA majoring in Political Studies in 2013.

She is also the founder of a group called The Black Wxman Healing Garden which she describes as “a safe space for black women to share their struggles and empower one another.” She is also a columnist for the Daily Vox, known for her bold and honest opinion pieces on social injustice.

(more…)