Shadows in the Night: Not Rat Pack worthy

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NEW ALBUM: Bob Dylan’s Shadows in the Night showcases a number of Frank Sinatra ballads. Photo: bobdylan.com

Bob Dylan’s Shadows in the Night is not one of his best considering his many decades of musical talent. The album which is a cover of a number of Frank Sinatra ballads lacks a finesse which makes it hard to listen to at certain points.

Shadows in the Night is his first studio album since 2012 and is not a traditional portrayal of Dylan’s usual music.

As both a Dylan and Sinatra fan – I feel that Dylan’s selection of the Sinatra songs he chose to cover were not ideal. The songs do not suit Dylan’s vocal style.

His vocals are well-suited for his regular country and blues music but it just doesn’t work for ballad or slow jazz.

It’s disappointing to say the least. I’ve always been a lover of Dylan and this album makes me wish he would have left things with his last album Tempest.

The only time I would ever think of listening to this album again would be while sitting on a deserted island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Not Hawaii.

There are some redeeming features on this album that may make it bearable and enjoyable (to a degree) for die-hard fans of both musicians.

Dylan attempts to recreate a more ‘Dylanesque’ version of Sinatra’s ballads which work on a few of the album tracks.

I feel that Dylan’s selection of the Sinatra songs he chose to cover were not ideal. The songs do not suit Dylan’s vocal style.

His rendition of That Lucky Old Sun and The Night We Called It A Day are lovely on the ears. It shows how deeply entrenched Dylan’s roots are in the ballads of the 1960’s.

The use of live instruments and unedited or synthesised sounds makes it unique from the usual contemporary music that is currently being released.

The music style, sound and genre transports one back to late 50’s and early 60’s which represents the slow-swing or ballad era.

I commend Dylan for breaking out of his usual blues and folk genre of music (which in all honesty is his best) but I feel he just didn’t crack it this time.

Good on him for taking this risk, but in this case it just didn’t work.

A long way to go for Wits Rugby

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By Jay Caboz

FNB Wits have been left a mountain to climb after falling to bottom place with a 63-24 loss to FNB University of Johannesburg after squaring off in their first Varsity Cup match.

“The match obviously didn’t pan out the way we would have wanted but we have to take the positives out of it. We started the game too slow and after UJ got a few early tries we were playing catch up, which is never an easy thing to do,” said Wits Captain Devin Montgomery.

UJ ran in an overwhelming 9 tries to Wits’ three. Wits also fell short of a needed bonus point by a single try in their last two games. The points would have narrowed the broadening gap between Ikeys and Shimlas who are now four and six points ahead of Wits.

Luckily, Wits’ position in the Varsity Cup is secured for the 2013 season. Montgomery explained that there was no relegation zone this year guaranteeing that Wits will have two years in the competition.

“This is to ensure that we are given a fair chance to learn and adapt to this high level of rugby,” he said, “We know that every game in this competition is going to be tough and each week it’s never going to get any easier.”

“We have defended a lot this season and there has been a big gap between the number of tackles we have had to make compared to our opponents in every game.”

Wits are gaining a reputation of a never-say-die attitude on the field. During their match against UJ, Wits showed brief moments of brilliance when going forward. One of the key members to watch is Number 8 Carel Greeff who has proven to be an influential player in the squad having added another two tries to his five for the season in four matches.

“Carel is a great player and is playing great rugby at the moment. We have a couple of go-to ball carriers in the team, one of which is Carel,” said the captain.

The No. 8 has become well known for his crashing runs through opposing lines and he is a tenacious tackler that has made him an important element in the squad.

Montgomery said the “this Varsity Cup campaign is about learning and gaining experience playing at this top level of rugby for us.”

The team’s goals were to work hard in training and aim to perform for the full 80 minutes with making as little mistakes as possible.

“Wits will earn the reputation of being a difficult fixture I have no doubt about that. The team has a special bond and because we spend so much time together there is a family sense amongst the team,” he said.

For more Varsity Cup action follow the link

FNB WIts vs FNB NWU-PUKKE

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Cool Kid on campus Caryn Upton

Cool Kid Caryn Upton is a 6th year Medical student who has been running a successful business for 4 years

Cool Kid Caryn Upton is a 6th year Medical student who has been running a successful business for 4 years

Story and Caption by Jay Caboz

Cool Kid
Caryn Upton spent four years of her varsity career tutoring and trying to make a little cash. She would earn, on average, R100 per hour and at the time she thought she was lucky to be paid that. Then she says she had a brainwave and “Study Doctor” tutoring was born.

What makes you a cool kid?
Well I am a sixth year med student who has been running a successful business for four years. I work hard and I play hard.

Why study medicine?
Initially, I was studying another degree, but then I found it was too easy and I wanted a challenge. I found working with people rewarding and then I knew that medicine was the right place for me.

Why open your own tutoring company?
One day, I was talking with my friend Claire Keene (now her business partner) who had also been a tutor and we said: “Hey, how come we work so hard and yet the company’s take a R300 profit? We could do a better job of this and make sure students get paid properly.” We were both med students and wanted to help people. We knew what it was like to be a tutor and were tired of getting screwed over by tutoring companies. So we thought “why not?”.

What makes your business cool?
It was started by two students who created something from nothing. We wanted to pay people for what they were worth.

How many tutors are you involved with?
At the moment we have about 70 to 80 tutors in our company.

How do you study and run a business?
Initially we were a lot smaller and I managed to fit it all in. But now we have grown so large, we have been able to hire someone and are currently looking to expand even further.

What achievements has Study Doctor made?
In 2012 we were voted as 94.7 FM’s business of the week. This year we are looking to pay back even further to the community and are trying to organise a charity that will give free tutoring for matrics.

Three Peas in a Classroom

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THREE IN A ROW: Triplets Delicia, Alicia and Felicia Arjunan (left to right) might look the same at first glance but each have their own personalities. Photo Jay Caboz

Published in the Witsvuvuzela
By Charlotte Chipangura
Photos by Jay Caboz

WITS students and staff have been left seeing triple with the addition of identical triplets Alicia, Delicia and Felicia Arjunan to the campus.

“At first glance, people can’t tell us apart but after two weeks they begin to see the differences, after a while they will so see that our personalities are similar, though not identical,” explained the chirpy Alicia.

Born 19 years ago on the 17th of August in Durban, the Alicia, Delicia and Felicia are studying BComm Philosophy, Politics & Economics, BA International Relations and BComm General, respectively.

According to Wikipedia, identical triplets are extremely rare, something that occurs only once in every 500 000 births. But multiple births are becoming more common because of the increased use of fertility treatments.

Triplets or twins are born when either an egg is fertilised more than once or if the mother has more than one egg at the same time.

According to Alicia, their mother named them in alphabetic order after they were born. But somehow Delicia, who developed in her own embryo, was born second while Alicia and Felicia shared their own embryo and came out apart.

The Arjunans say they hope to be involved in modelling and advertising where their status as triplets could be put to good use.

Peter Maher, Wits alumni relations director, said his office had no record of twins or triplets studying at Wits at the same time.

“Unfortunately our database isn’t able to capture or indicate family relationships,” he said
The Arjunans always move around campus together and say it is normal for them to be seen as a collective and not as individuals.

“This is what we have always known since we were born. Maybe it will be a hard knock when we start working and have to go our separate ways,” said Felicia.

The girls celebrate their birthdays by dressing in identical outfits. They share the same interests and friends as they make a point of introducing new friends to each other.

“Because we spend so much time together, we have formed similar likes and dislikes,” said Alicia.
Being twins, and moving around in a group, also affects their love life and how boys approach them.
“They become our friends first, and then they get to know us,” said Alicia.

“They find something they are attracted to, and then they start spending time with the particular person they like,” added Delicia.

Felicia said guys who say they wouldn’t mind dating any of the sisters did not amuse her and her siblings.

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THREE IN A ROW: Triplets Felicia(left),Alicia and Delicia Arjunan (back) might look the same at first glance but each have their own personalities. Photo Jay Caboz

Tough Run-In for FNB Wits Rugby

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HARD BALL: Captain of FNB Wits Devin Montgomery drives through FNB NWU-Pukke’s defensive line during their match at the Wits Rugby Stadium on Monday evening. Wits have not won a game since being promoted to the Varsity Cup. Photo Jay Caboz

Story and Photos by Jay Caboz

FNB Wits took a beating after FNB NWU-Pukke ran in a haul of 10 tries to, losing 71-25 on Monday nights Varsity Cup match held at the Wits Rugby Stadium.

Despite the overwhelming score line, Wits put up a good show and for the majority of the game were in running contention. But the visitors from North-West University tore through Wits defence in the second half with 5 unanswered tries leaving Wits in the dust and one try short of a salvaged bonus point.

“We were incredibly happy with our performance in the first half, we just have to learn to play for 80 minutes,” said Wits captain Devin Montgomery.

The score line opened a minute after the starting whistle when Wits flanker Thato Mavundla ran the ball over the line from a driving maul deep in Pukke’s half.

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TRIES FOR CHARITY: A fan waits for the kick-off between FNB Wits and FNB NWU-Pukke. The pink ball is a new introduction to this year’s Varsity Cup and allows players to add a R2 000 donation if they score for their team during the “Rugby that Rocks Time” period. Wits Rugby Club supports Usindiso Ministries, a shelter that offers support, assistance and care to teenage girls, abused women and their children. Photo Jay Caboz

The ball continued to roll in Wits’ favour after Carel Greeff broke through Pukke’s defensive line and put another try in.In the 15th minute Pukke shook off their shock and responded with a try of their own to bring the score to 16-5.
Pukke put another eight points on the board when SJ Niemand drove over the try line.

Wits were able to extend their lead by another two points after converting a long-ranged penalty to end the first quarter. The home team managed to extend their lead to 10 points when they scored what would be their last try of the match.

Play continued to swing in both halves with Wits making some crunching tackles. But Pukke gained some level footing after scoring another try to decrease the deficit. The final nail on the coffin was drawn when Pukke put in two more tries to end the half 31-25.

The second half remained a contest until 15 minutes in when the floodgates opened. Pukke ran in five more tries which completely overwhelmed Wits’ defence. The visitors size and field play was just too much for Wits to handle.

“Yes we took a beating, but a lot of the points we conceded were from mistakes on our own behalf and turning over the ball,” said Montgomery. “We have UJ [University of Johannesburg] next week and it’s a more familiar game to us than this week. We are looking forward to it.”

The result leaves Wits hanging in last place on the log, two points behind 7th Ikeys (UCT). Wits will need to put in a good performance against UJ, who are currently sitting 3rd, to draw some points ahead of their clashes with bottom of the log teams.

jay@witsvuvuzela.com

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Cool Kid on Campus: Mark Tatham

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STUDENT Mark Tatham started his varsity career doing a BCom in Business Management. A year later, he fell in love with dance and is now completing a degree in physical theatre at the Wits School of Arts. He recently performed in the physical theatre production In The Company of Wolves which was on show during o-week.

This sports crazy student is always busy doing something whether it’s scrambling over buildings doing parkour, playing hockey or working as a DJ.

What inspired you to change to a degree in the arts?
When I was at school I was interested in performing, but when I came to university I thought I should do a BCom first and then complete a BA in Drama. After a year of studying I just couldn’t handle it and so I dropped out and started a BA in 2011.

Why become a dancer?
I always saw myself as an actor. But one day I joined the parkour club for fun, in my first year as a drama student, and I fell in love with movement. Shortly after we were allowed to take physical theatre as a course and it allowed me to do what I loved.

When did you know you wanted to perform physical theatre?
I was chosen for the lead role in the play Carrying The Fire, directed by Bailey Snyman, which was on show last year. It was my experience under his direction that really cemented my love of performance.

How do you prepare mentally for a performance?
I have found the best way for me to focus is to clear my head. I walk around in circles and try not to think of my lines or what I am supposed to do next. When I am performing I do everything on instinct.

What do you love about performance?
I love the adrenaline rush of having to give the audience a show. It’s the same reason why I play sport.

Have you had to overcome any difficulties since doing your performances?
Injuries are always a problem. I have sprained my wrist, torn ligaments in my ankle and last year I broke my thumb.

How often do you practice for a performance?
Usually a production takes one to three months of work. We will practice five times a week for about three to five hours at a time. By the time you are on stage you know all your movements backwards and don’t even think about what happens next. It just happens.

Modernising  the classical fairy tale of Red Riding Hood, In a Company of Wolves breaks the notions of feminine vulnerability in this high physical theatre production.

Modernising the classical fairy tale of Red Riding Hood, In a Company of Wolves breaks the notions of feminine vulnerability in this high physical theatre production.

A fairytale retold … well!

Modernising  the classical fairy tale of Red Riding Hood, In a Company of Wolves breaks the notions of feminine vulnerability in this high physical theatre production.

Modernising the classical fairytale of Red Riding Hood, In a Company of Wolves breaks the notions of feminine vulnerability in this highly physical theatre production. Photo: Jay Caboz

One usually associates a fairy tale, like Red Riding Hood, with a small unassuming girl who gently ambles her way through the woods on the way to grandma’s house. Unknown to the red-caped girl, she is followed by a fierce wolf who among other things intends to make a lunch for two, a dinner for one. If the wolf had to see the Wits’ theatre production In The Company of Wolves, HE would have been on the menu.

In this production, the meek girl is transformed. She is manifested though the bold manoeuvres of a set of dancers that challenge the misconceptions of feminine vulnerability.

In the Company of Wolves Cast: Kirsten Mohamed,Raezeen Wentworth, Chanelle Sardinha and Linda Mdena (Left to Right Back) and Mark Tathum and Jason Solomon (Left to Right Front)

In the Company of Wolves Cast (left to right back): Kirsten Mohamed, Raezeen Wentworth, Chanelle Sardinha and Linda Mdena  and Mark Tathum and Jason Solomon (left to right front)

To watch the cast effortlessly weave among each other was simply sublime.  Equally sublime was the musical score which paired perfectly with the dancing style. A rhythmic ebb and flow was beautifully built up to a crescendo at the end of the 25 minute production.

From walls to backstage the cast makes use good use of the Wits Nunnery, which seems very cramped when six dancers try to perform on it.

In a weirdly uncomfortable way, the cramped feeling adds toward the play’s success. You cannot distance yourself from the action.

It’s in your face and you become more involved as a result. You are also forced to respect the level of planning and curatorship involved in manoeuvring in such a small space.

Cast member Mark Tathum said that the crew was hoping the production would be in contention for the Grahamstown Arts Festival later this year.

At a cost of R10 a ticket the show is well worth making the long walk down to the South side of East Campus. It will be on till the end of the week (8 Feb) and is only showing at 13h00.

Directed by Jason Solomon and Chanelle Sardinha In The Company of Wolves delightfully overturns an out of date nursery tale and is a must see. Book it now.

In the Company of Wolves
Venue: The Wits Nunnery, close to the Wits Theatre, East Campus
Dates: O Week, 4 – 8 February 2013
Time: 13h00
Length: 25 Minutes
Cost: R10 per person

jaycaboz@witsvuvuzela.com

Modernising  the classical fairy tale of Red Riding Hood, In a Company of Wolves breaks the notions of feminine vulnerability in this high physical theatre production.

Modernising the classical fairy tale of Red Riding Hood, In a Company of Wolves breaks the notions of feminine vulnerability in this high physical theatre production.  Photo Jay Caboz

Modernising  the classical fairy tale of Red Riding Hood, In a Company of Wolves breaks the notions of feminine vulnerability in this high physical theatre production.

Modernising the classical fairy tale of Red Riding Hood, In a Company of Wolves breaks the notions of feminine vulnerability in this high physical theatre production. Photo Jay Caboz

Modernising  the classical fairy tale of Red Riding Hood, In a Company of Wolves breaks the notions of feminine vulnerability in this high physical theatre production.

Modernising the classical fairy tale of Red Riding Hood, In a Company of Wolves breaks the notions of feminine vulnerability in this high physical theatre production. Photo Jay Caboz

Lucky number 4

Destiny`s favourite child Beyonce`s 4th solo album has been out for six weeks and it has already been certified platinum by the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America), meaning it has shifted one million copies in the States.

It’s not doing badly in the overseas markets too, as ‘4’ debuted at no.1 in most countries outside of the States and is on the top 5  on South Africa`s album charts.

The album is clearly doing well even though its first single Run the World (Girls) did not blow away fans and critics. Maybe its the song`s video where ‘Bey’ puts on some impressive pantsula moves under the guidance of Mozambican dance duo Tofo Tofo, which won the hearts of her fans.

On the album track list, ‘Run The World’ is pushed to the bottom and the album opens with the ballade ‘1 Plus 1’.

Overall ‘4’ does what previous Beyonce` albums have done; they make you dance, sing along, provide a song for every emotion experienced in a relationship. But this album is more of a love fest than her other albums and there`s a sense of maturity in her lyrics-the woman is going to be 30 soon, and it comes across on ‘4’.

‘4’ begins with ballads where Beyonce displays her vocal range the first few songs.

The pace picks up from the ladies anthem ‘Best Thing I Never Had’ and just has feel-good; up-tempo such as ‘Love on Top’ and the energetic ‘Countdown’ and ‘End of Time’ which change the tone of the album to full-on trumpets and drums.

‘4’ is a must-have for die-hard Beyonce` fans, and is refreshing in a time when every second song on radio has some Euro-pop beat or Euro-dance DJ on it.  Beyonce` makes a good attempt at refreshing ‘old-school R&B ‘, which has over the years lost itself.

Just some background on the album title,:4 is Beyonce`s favourite number, as she explains on her ‘Year of 4’ documentary(available on Youtube.com). 4 is hers, hubby Jay-Z and mom Tina`s birth dates. ‘4’ is also the date and month she and Jay-Z got married in 2008.

Vuvu Rating : 7/10