ELECTIONS: Man loses job because he exercises his right to vote

BANNED DRIVER: Nymhardt Black (48) sits in the car with his wife Debbie Black (40) after voting and wait to speak to an IEC member to lodge their complaint. Photo: Luke Matthews

BANNED DRIVER: Nymhardt Black (48) sits in the car with his wife Debbie Black (40) after voting and wait to speak to an IEC member to lodge their complaint. Photo: Luke Matthews

By: Palesa Tshandu and Anazi Zote 

A tow-truck driver was fired from his job yesterday when his employer would not allow him to miss work to vote in yesterday’s general elections.

Nymhardt Black (48) who was an employee at A1 Assist in Industria, North Roodeport said he lost his job because he took off from work to cast his vote.

According to Black, his former employer told him to “come park your truck because you’re fired”. Black responded by saying, “We can’t get fired because we want to vote.”

The frustrated former employee lodged a complaint with the Independent Election Commission (IEC) in the hopes of arguing for his right to participate in the elections.

The employer, who is a manager at the tow-trucking company refused to give Wits Vuvuzela comment on the matter.

Black, who is the sole bread winner in his family of four, does not regret losing his job in exchange for exercising his right to vote but said, “My wife is not happy that I got fired.”

He says the decision for leaving his job is also related to the working conditions at the company. His lack of regret for losing his job is also related to the bad working conditions at the company. He only earned R1300 per week, which amounted to R5200 per month while working the whole day, every day.

He does not wish to return to his former job but is currently looking for a new one.

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Artists collabo for LGBTI awareness

CRAFTY SYMBOLISM: Onlookers were drawn to the Faces and Faces wall, full of black and white photographs taken by visual artist  Zanele Muholi.                                                                                                  Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

CRAFTY SYMBOLISM: Onlookers were drawn to the Faces and Faces wall, full of black and white photographs taken by visual artist Zanele Muholi. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

Walking onto the eerily silent ramp that leads to the new exhibition at the Wits Art Museum, one is met by death. Small mounds of sand stand,holding up colourful wooden crosses that have dates of birth and death written on them.These graves that lie in glass containers are in the Zanele Muholi’s Mo(u)rning section of the exhibition.

The next piece of the collection, Faces and Faces catches the eye immediately as a wall of black and white portraits look one in the eye. There are some gaps between some of the photographs by Muholi which speak to the nameless but dated graves.

“The spaces were left there to show that they could have been a part of this section of the exhibition if they weren’t killed for being gay and lesbian,” explained facilitator Ace Kekana, whose face appears in one of Muholi’s portraits. Queer and Trans Art-iculations: Collaborative Art for Social Change is a collaborative exhibition by visual artists, Muholi and Gabrielle le Roux. [pullquote align=”right”]”…men who gang rape women, who murder lesbians, who beat their wives – they walk the streets as free men.”[/pullquote]

Muholi’s work is on the ground floor of the museum with a focus on the LGBTI community in South Africa – their beauty, their struggle, their murders and more. Muholi is not only a photographer, so her work varies and in this exhibit includes some of her bead work and a documentary film.

The most elaborate display in Muholi’s section are rosaries that hang from the ceiling. The beads in the rosaries are tennis balls and kitchen utensils. The vertical end of the cross at the end of the rosary is made from a knife which represents the violent killings of members of the LGBTI community experience, and the horizontal end from braai forks to represent the supposed hell killers think they’ve sent their victims to, or perhaps the lived hell victims endure.

This is one of the rosaries that hang from the ceiling. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

This is one of the rosaries that hang from the ceiling. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

“When people kill based on gender they like to say it’s for religious reasons, these crosses represent how dangerous that kind of thinking can be,” said Kekana.

The most moving part of Muholi’s exhibited work is a wall with a number of written messages from victims and their family members about their experiences. One of the messages read: “Here in South Africa you have judges sending women to jail for stealing a loaf of bread to feed her baby, but men who gang rape women, who murder  lesbians, who beat their wives – they walk the streets as free men.”

In contrast to the quiet reception on entering Muholi’s floor of the exhibition, walking down the ramp into the basement area, sounds from the television screens set up with short documentaries by Le Roux lure attendees with their mixed up buzz.

Le Roux’s collection, Proudly African & Transgender and Proudly Trans in Turkey looks at the experiences “trans and intersex people in Turkey and Africa,” said Kekana. Another facilitator, Thekwane Mpisholo is in one of the portraits put on display by Le Roux.

The painted portraits are inclusive of their “subjects” and this can be seen in the quotes the artist let them scribble on their actual portraits.

The newly launched Wits Centre for Diversity Studies, helped to find the funding for this project. “They’re the ones who helped us with the planning and funding because they (Diversity Studies) study things that aren’t ordinarily studied by other faculties – that’s how they came on board,” said Mpisholo.

There is a lot to read, watch and see at this exhibition and people can do so until March 30 2014 at the Wits Art Museum.

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Wits Twitter War: DASO vs SRC


Wits Twitter War: DASO vs SRC

The Democratic Alliance Student Organisation at Wits, is set to petition against the #right2protest campaign headed by the SRC.

Storified by Wits Vuvuzela · Tue, May 07 2013 06:01:06

#right2protest silence is complicity! Make your voice heard outside the matrix pic.twitter.com/2cSDhrwIKLMSAWits
SRC-accused want a public trial | Wits VuvuzelaApr 26, 2013 … THE SRC is calling for a public trial for 11 students—nine of whom are SRC members—who have been charged for possible …
The SRC interrupted a music recital during Israel Apartheid Week in March. Following the disruption several SRC members were charged with “contravention of the University’s code of conduct”. The campaign is centred around getting the charges dropped. 
We urge students to support the 11 Charged students by emailing ‘drop charges’ to chlewis@iafrica.com #right2protestWitsSRC
urge all progressive forces to email "drop charges" to chlewis@iafrica.com to support wits students #right2protest"@ButiManamelaFeziwe Ndwayana
Support @WitsSRC in their call for @WitsUniversity management to drop charges against the 11. @ancylhq @ANCYL_GP @ANC_YOUTH #right2protestGontse Gabbana
@karynmaughan support @WitsSRC for charges to be dropped by @WitsUniversity management. Charged for stomping feet & singing #Right2ProtestThato Emm
*vluits* "@WitsSRC: #Right2Protest Kubi kubi kubi s’yaya s’yaya s’yaya kuyoProtesta. Noma besithulisa, s’yaya, besithuka, s’yaya s’yaya !!"Phila Parker
When a university undermines our #Right2Protest , it’s only fair that we fight back. Join the movement.Pearl Pillay
@JubesHcom2013 is fully behind the @WitsSRC @WitsPYA and other students who are charged,we as students have the #Right2Protestpamela mpumelelo
Just received word that all five faculty councils have declared support for the #Right2Protest campaign. Cc @WitsSRCSibulele Mgudlwa
DASO responded by tweeting against the #right2protest campaign. 
#Right2Protest #DontBeFooled @Jarrod_Delport @deekhay @msayanvala @WitsVuvuzela @WitsSRC @USibulele twitpic.com/copwgaLuyolo Mphithi
We call on @WitsSRC to be held accountable! #Right2Protest email kiriti.menon@wits.ac.za to endorse chargesDASO Wits
@TazEssop14 src members disrupted an approved event which was attended by members of the public who paid for ticketsMohammad Sayanvala
@TazEssop14 @DASOWits @WitsSRC We support the #right2protest, but we condemn actions that violate the uni code of conduct.Mohammad Sayanvala
Some people mistake their #right2protest with a supposed right of disrupt and destruct…Mohammad Sayanvala
The rebut from SRC members and other tweeps, did not seem to take kindly to DASO’s criticism. 
@DASOWits don’t be on the wrong side of history, criticising @WitsSRC for the #right2protest is denying a Constitutional Right!Tasneem
But these people of DASO are annoying maan, what sort of nonsense have they written on that stupid poster…rha maan!!pamela mpumelelo
The DA shouldn’t even be called a Political Party. They’re like a nursery school for the ideologically bankrupt.Pearl Pillay