Hockey Women fail to stand against Jeppe St Andrews

Shooting High: The Wits Hockey Women, in blue and yellow, watch as a shot by Jeppe St Andrews midfielder Jules Cass, in black and blue, goes toward the goal. Wits lost the game 6-3.

Shooting High: The Wits Hockey Women, in blue and yellow, watch as a shot by Jeppe St Andrews midfielder Jules Cass, in black and blue, goes toward the goal. Wits lost the game 6-3.

By Jay Caboz

The Wits Hockey Women lost their second Indoor Premier League match  3-6 against Jeppe St Andrews at the Fourways Indoor Stadium on Monday night.

Wits got off to a good start at the beginning of the game. They produced a number of neat plays along the board and managed to get behind Jeppe’s defence to test the keeper. The pressure continued to build for the Witsies and within the fourth minute Wits were rewarded with a penalty corner. Witsie and former South Africa U21 defender Demi du Toit stepped up to slam home a drag flick from the top of the D to put Wits up 1-0.

Jeppe managed to shake off the goal and soon after began to turn the tide against Wits.

Wits conceded a number of interceptions along the forward line which allowed Jeppe to counter attack in force. This proved too much to handle for the Witsies as they conceded a pair of penalty corners. In the 11th minute Jeppe’s Roxanne Turner drew the sides level with an un-saveable drag flick in the bottom right hand corner.

Jeppe’s Jules Cass, a former Wits student, added another goal from a penalty corner in the 15th minute.

One minute before halt-time, Wits manage to scrape the scores level after Witsie striker Jaime Martin found a gap in Jeppe’s defence to set up an easy tap in for Wits’ Gabirela Garcia.

During the second half Wits struggled to get the ball out from their own 16 yard hits, this was mainly due to a change in strategy from the Jeppe side who stepped higher in defence preventing most of the ball getting to the Wits forwards. Jeppe showed great composure and awareness and pulled any chance of a victory away from Wits.

In quick succession Jeppe scored two goals in the 22nd and 25th minutes to put Wits 4-2 behind.

Wits came back with another goal from Du Toit in the 27th minute, this time taken from a penalty stroke.

Wits goal keeper Zimisile Shange was peppered with a number of shots from all corners of the D. The students were lucky to leave just two more goals unanswered in the 29th and 33rd minute as Jeppe put the score line to 6-3.

Wits coach Peter de Lange threw in one final gamble by replacing Shange with an extra outfield player with three minutes to go. The change in strategy was ineffectual in returning a goal but did manage to stem the flow of goals as players were able pick up loose unmarked players.

After a comfortable 5-3 win last week Wits’ hopes of keeping with the top competitors in the league took a major knock after the loss.

jaycaboz@witsvuvuzela.com

Witsie defneders Kirsti Morely Jepson (left) and Demi du Toit (Middle) tackle Roxanne Turner from Jeppe St Andrews

Witsie defneders Kirsten Morley-Jepson (left) and Gabirela Garcia (middle) tackle Roxanne Turner (right) from Jeppe St Andrews

20130204_0215

A Wits striker narrowly misses a shot to the far post during their match against Jeppe St Andrews

 

20130204_0536

20130204_0305

Gabriela Garcia watches the ball lift off a Jeppe St Andrews player.

 

Wits beats out Crusaders

Wits defenders tackle Crusaders forward Sarah Harley.

Wits defenders tackle Crusaders forward Sarah Harley. Pic: Jay Caboz

Playing in their first game of the Indoor Season, Wits 1st Women’s Hockey put to bed a half-asleep Crusaders 1st with a comfortable 5-3 win, at the Fourways High School Indoor Hall on Monday evening.

From the start of the game Wits’ manoeuvres up front proved to be too difficult to keep track of for the Crusaders defence.  One of Wit’s new signings, Kirstin Simone, found herself with acres of space in the 7th minute at the top of the D and neatly slotted the first goal of the game.

Shortly after, Simone found herself in a similar situation and calmly dribbled the keeper to put Wits 2-0 up in the 10th minute.

Crusaders’ Des Miller managed to get a grip on the game for her side after she pulled a goal back just before the stroke of half time in the 19th minute.

The second half  saw Crusaders begin to have more and more of an influence on the game.  But Wits Captain Jamie Martin halted the Crusaders build-up after she dribbled the Crusaders goalkeeper, on counter attack, in the 23rd minute and gave Wits a two goal cushion.

Thanks to a brilliant piece of individual play by Crusaders striker Sarah Harley, Crusad

Wits Striker Kirstin Simone takes a shot shortly into the first half.

Wits Striker Kirstin Simone takes a shot shortly into the first half. Pic: Jay Caboz

ers managed to pull another goal back to bring the score to 3-2.

Wits sat back and cushioned a steady stream of pressure from Crusaders. As a result Wits conceded a number of penalty corners. But Crusaders didn’t take advantage of the corners, mainly thanks to some acrobatic aerial saves from Wits goalkeeper Zimisile Shanghe.

Crusaders ended up committing too many players forward leaving too much space for Wit’s strikers, who positioned themselves for the counter attack opportunities. Wits defender Demi du Toit found Simone once again unmarked on the side boards high in Crusaders territory. Simone duly converted leaving the score line at 4-2, and completing a hat trick for herself.

Crusaders threw in a final gamble by substituting their keeper with another striker and opting to play with six outfield players. The strategy seemed to be paying off as Crusaders continued to have shots on target. But Wits’ Martin cornered a lone defender and slotted a 5th goal.

Crusaders Heidi Tessendorf managed to squeeze in one final goal in the 38th minute but it was a case of too little too late for the losing team.

The final whistle blew with Wits winning the match 5-3 and announcing their introduction to the 2013 season.

 

Fire blazes can be prevented

By Jay Caboz follow him on WordPress or for more Photography

Gavin, who lives at number 15 Juweel Street, Jukskei Park, noticed that something was amiss after he hearing strange noises coming from his neighbour’s house. It was 4am but from his bedroom window it looked as if sunrise had happened already. The house next door, number 17 was on fire.

“I then heard the sound of the flames as the thatch caught fire. I phoned the fire department and went outside to start wetting my own thatch roof with the garden hose.”

By the time the firemen arrived the flames were two meters high.

Firemen struggled with the fire. They needed more water but the only fire hydrant was on the next street. Four more trucks and a portable water truck were called in to handle the blaze.

Until they came, firemen controlled the fire by wetting the border areas of the house. Other neighbours also began to wet their thatch rooftops in case the blaze spread.

“The house had been empty for a couple of months.” said Gavin to the other neighbours gathered around the street. One of them was watching the fire with her coffee mug still steaming.

Despite rumours of squatters on the property firemen said they found no evidence that anyone had been in the house when the fire had started.

Stories like these are a regular occurrence in South Africa’s wintertime. Winter is dry in Joburg, and cold, according the city of Johannesburg these are the two leading causes that lead to fires in households in the city. People turn on their heaters and braziers, and carelessness can lead to devastating fires.

Bringing home reality

The following is taken from an article written by Camilla Bath, Deputy News Editor for Eyewitness News, in Johannesburg.

“Fire is a terrifying thing. It tears through homes, guts buildings, destroys property and devastates the lives of those who survive it. Many don’t.”

Years ago, as a field reporter, I covered the story of a fire at an electrical sub-station in Johannesburg in which a man died. Authorities suspected the victim had been living in the sub-station and had inadvertently touched a live wire, starting the blaze late at night.

Early the following morning, I caught a glimpse of his blackened body through the painted slats of an air vent. It is an image that has stayed with me in vivid detail, one I wish I’d never seen: the badly burnt corpse somehow frozen in time, crouching, one hand outstretched, his face formless, its features seared away. Perhaps worse than that stiff figure was the smell of burnt flesh, unexpectedly sweet and cloying.

Every time I hear or read about another fatal fire, I’m taken straight back to that scene.”

Follow more of her article here –http://sawdis1.blogspot.com/2012/06/real-burning-issue.html

  • Only SABS-approved electrical and/or cooking apparatus should be used.
  • Heaters, two-plate stoves and so on, should only be used for their intended purposes, as per the instruction manual.
  • Do not leave candles burning unattended.
  • Experience has shown that in informal settlements – though this can also be the case in brick and mortar structures – people tend to disregard even the smallest detail regarding fire safety by warming themselves using primus stoves and braziers (mbawulas), only to fall asleep and their homes go up in flames.
  • Alcohol should be consumed in moderation.
  • In case of emergency, call 10177 or 112.

Everyone is welcome to volunteer at a fire station in Johannesburg of his/her choice. Life skills acquired through such volunteering can be used in life-saving situations. A well-trained volunteer can perform cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on victims of drowning and smoke inhalation. They can also train members of their own communities to be life-savers.

  • Fire sources such as heaters, stoves and irons should not be left unattended.
  • Boxes of matches and cigarette lighters should be stored safely.
  • Children like to experiment– always trying this and that. Their actions can have dire consequences, not only to your home but to the whole community

Make sure that your house is properly ventilated; there must always be enough fresh air. This will prevent winter-related airborne diseases.

Other sites of interest 

Firewise

Dangerous areas

Preventing veld fires

ER 24

Adapt or die

Preventing climate change is no longer the issue – we must adapt to it.

 This was the message of photojournalist Jeffrey Barbee at the screening of his documentary Creating a Climate of Change at the Wits Origins Centre on Tuesday.

 Barbee’s film shows real-world examples of how southern African rural communities have adapted to variable rainfall and arid soil caused by climate change.

 Barbee, who studied climatology as a young researcher, said huge issues in Africa, like AIDS and starvation, were compounded by climate change. Climate change adaptations, like conservation farming and the restoration of ecosystems, provided jobs, food and tourism revenue for communities.

 Conservation farming makes the best use of resources in a variable climate.

 Barbee said that when people watched the film they should think: “Ah, we can do something. If they [African communities] can do it, so can we.”

 He hopes his film will reach as many people as possible, but said he needed funding to bring it to poorer communities without internet access.

 Although this documentary focuses on rural adaptations, his next documentary would present urban solutions. Barbee believed conservation farming could be applied on a commercial scale, based on his experience of a Zambian project.

“We all need to be part of the solution,” he said.

 He concurred with scientist Francois Engelbrecht that climate change would definitely happen.  

 Engelbrecht, an atmospheric modeller at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), told the audience the reliance of the world’s economy on fossil fuels had committed us to climate change. Even if greenhouse gas emissions were kept at a level that limited global temperatures to a 2˚C rise in the next century, southern Africa’s temperatures would still rise by 4˚C.

The greenhouse effect caused more high pressure systems (associated with the clear skies in winter), which in turn caused less rain to fall and higher surface temperatures.

Wits’ Global Change and Sustainability Research Institute was recently established to research “adaptation and innovation in the rapidly changing southern African region”. Climate change is a major cause of these changes.

The documentary can be seen at: http://www.youtube.com/user/jefftube4view?feature=watch.