Review: Prime, is it worth the hype?  

Prime a popular drink amongst teenagers fails to quench thirst with no guarantee it won’t leave a bad taste in your mouth   

Prime, the new popular range of sports and energy drinks amongst teenagers that retailed in South Africa at Checkers stores from May 1, 2023 disappoints in taste.  

The drinks were launched in 2022 by popular YouTubers, Logan Paul and Olajide Olayinka Williams Olatunji also known as KSI. “We created Prime to showcase what happens when rivals come together as brothers and business partners to fill the void where great taste meets function,” said the pair on their Prime website. 

The drinks, which are marketed by Prime Hydration have been publicised on social media platforms that it was sold out shortly after it was stocked to retail, with scores of teenagers and parents standing in long queues to stock up. 

I had been trying to get my hands on it for more than a week before it was finally restocked at my closest Checkers in Rosebank mall. The drinks are clearly in high demand, thanks to its brand reputation and how well it was advertised by the YouTubers.  

There are four flavours to choose from which are: tropical punch, lemon lime, ice pop and blue raspberry. I got all four bottles, with each drink retailing at R39,99. 

The ice pop flavour tastes like medicine, it’s sweet and bitter at the same time and it leaves an after taste in the mouth after drinking. The blue raspberry tastes a bit sweet. You can taste the raspberry flavour in it as well as the coconut water. It also tastes similar to the Powerade energy drink, the mountainblast flavour.  

The lemon- lime flavour, tastes good with a hint of sweetness and bitterness, you can taste the lemon lime in it. While the tropical punch flavour is sweet and it tastes like a combination of guava juice and watermelon. 

Despite the flavours, the drink does not hydrate, instead, I had heart palpitations a few minutes after consuming the drinks – even though I did not taste all of them at the same time.  

Uyathandwa Mani, final year BCom student at Wits told Wits Vuvuzela that she did not feel any difference after drinking it, “it did not hydrate me at all, the only thing I felt was a headache.” 

The ingredients listed on Prime include: 10,5% coconut water, filtered water, branch chain amino acids, electrolytes, vitamin B, E and A, citric acid, several antioxidants and flavouring. 

The Sport Science Institute of South Africa (SSISA) said on their website, “Although the Prime website claims the Hydration drink to be suitable for all ages, other sources have warned children under 15 years old from consuming it. Based on the nutrition label provided on the Prime website, the Prime Hydration drink compares with similar drinks in the sports/hydration category.” 

However, the two creators said in a video on Paul’s YouTube channel that Prime hydration drink has no caffeine which makes it safe for children to consume whereas the Prime energy drink (which is not available in South Africa yet) has caffeine and it’s not suitable for people under the age of 18.  

The packaging of the hydration drink is very simple. I like the ice pop flavour bottle which has several colours combined that make it interesting and appealing. The rest are simple 500ml bottles coloured blue, lime and red with the drinks’ name written in black. 

Overall, the hydration drink is overhyped as people made exaggerating claims about the drink saying it’s too good and truly hydrates. Wits Vuvuzela rates it a five out of 10 because the taste was disappointing in three flavours. For the price it retails for, one expected more.  

FEATURED IMAGE: Friends drinking Prime hydration drinks at night. Photo: Sinazo Mondo

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UJ dumps South Point

By Phumi Ramalepe

NSFAS students sign petition for university to reconsider decision.

The University of Johannesburg has rejected South Point’s 2019 accreditation application after the property company failed to fulfil certain requirements by the university’s policy on privately-owned accommodation.

The policy stipulates that, “Rooms should be furnished with lockable closets, single bed steel or wooden frames including mattress/sponge, study desk, chair, bookshelf, study lamp, panel heater and paper bin.”

The policy further states that the kitchen of each ‘Subscribing Service Provider’ should have “a minimum provision of cold storage, 210 litres per five students”.

After the 2019 inspection, the two Braamfontein South Point buildings (Norvic and KSI) previously accredited by U J since 2004 were deemed not to meet the requirements due to the absence of panel heaters and fridges.   

Executive Head of Precinct Development at South Point, Josef Talotta, told Wits Vuvuzela that, “In 2011, [UJ] gazetted new norms and standard criteria (introducing communal refrigerators and panel heaters) for its accreditation partners…we were not accredited for 2019, in spite of previous approvals against the same criteria.”

Last year, South Point “housed approximately 450 students as a UJ-accredited housing provider”, according to Talotta.

Some of those students circulated a petition last week to have UJ reconsider its decision not to accredit South Point. By January 31, the petition had garnered 90 signatures.   

Mpho Stephen, a third-year LLB student who has been staying at South Point for two years said, “I helped distribute the petition because we want a place to stay. We are also trying to tell [UJ] our story. Everybody has a right to be heard,” said Stephen.

UJ students who are funded by NSFAS say they are dismayed by UJ’s decision as they did not have to pay for top-ups and a deposit at South Point before signing their leases.

“I went to J1 (a private accommodation property in Braamfontein) and there is space but…now I have to pay R3 750 for deposit. Imagine the strain I have to put on my parents. I wouldn’t have to pay for deposit at South Point while on NSFAS,” said Mpho Khosa, a third-year Film and Television student at UJ.

South Point is appealing UJ’s decision, according to Talotta.


Third Suicide of First Semester

A Wits student killed himself in his residence room last week Tuesday, apparently due to academic pressure.

Wandile Mashinini, 2nd year BComm marketing, was  found in his room at South Point’s KSI residence. According to a friend, who asked not to be named, his girlfriend became worried when he didn’t respond to her knocking.  She and the building manager then broke through the door and found he had hanged himself .  It is believed that he left a note.

The friend said his Facebook updates had shown he was suicidal. “He said: ‘I will kill myself and die’ and ‘I’m tired of all of this and am sorry to my family’. We thought he was joking.”

She said Mashinini had been struggling academically and reportedly had not met the requirements for two of his courses.

Psychologist Prof Lourens Schlebusch said academic problems were one of the leading causes of suicide among students.

“Family problems, academic-related problems, stress and psychological disorders are some of the reasons young adults commit suicide.”

Another Wits student, Magashnee Stephanie Moonsamy, shot herself in May this year, apparently also due to academic pressure.

Janeske Botes, Moonsamy’s Media studies lecturer, said she did not pass two of her major essays in her second year and was not registered for third year Media Studies.

Schlebusch said: “Individuals contemplating suicide often don’t seek help and appear to be fine.

There were a number of warning signs, which should be taken note of, he said. People with suicidal feelings often showed sad or anxious behaviour, a drop in academic performance as well as changes in eating habits.

Friends described Mashinini  as being full of life, funny and loving. “We have lost a significant part of ourselves. He will be missed,” said his friend.

Wandile will be laid to rest this weekend in his home town of Barbaton, Mpumalanga.

Schlebusch urged students to seek help if they were struggling or considering suicide. At Wits, the Career Counselling and Development Unit (CCDU) offers counselling services to students.

The CCDU is offering a full-day workshop to Wits academic and support staff on July 20 to equip them to identify students in need of psychological or psychiatric intervention.

Published in Vuvuzela 16th Edition 20 July 2012