Cool kid on campus

TITILOPE ADESANYA is a content producer of Afrodisiac, a weekly show on campus radio station VoWFM.

NAIJA COOL: Titilope Adesanya outside VoWFm. The 23 year old enjoys going to events and hopes to one day be paid for reviewing events. PHOTO: Zanta Nkumane

NAIJA COOL: Titilope Adesanya outside VoWFm. The 23 year old enjoys going to events and hopes to one day be paid for reviewing events.                                                    PHOTO: Zanta Nkumane

Twenty three year old Adesanya, originally from Nigeria, arrived in Johannesburg in 2013 for her first year at college.
Her name means eternal gratitude in Yoruba, one of the languages spoken in Nigeria, yet she coyly admits, “I can barely speak Yoruba”. Her show which focuses on African entertainment is clearly close to her heart. “I love the show, we focus on African entertainment outside of South Africa as it’s covered by other shows,” she said.
She’s been at VowFM for the last year. “I started out in the marketing team and moved over to producing content and news reporting this year. It’s been fun” she said.
Adesanya is also a volunteer for an organisation known as Starting Now, whose mandate is to make an impact within communities in which the volunteers live. The organisation is active in 3 countries: Nigeria, Ghana and South Africa.
“We organise an annual camping trip for the children at Christ Christian Church Care Centre (the 5Cs),” she reveals as she gently tucks her maroon braids behind her ear, “We take them to Harties [Hartebeesport Dam], for three days in December”.
She is currently doing groundwork for a project that will see her partnering with Black & Gold, a Nigerian fashion house. The partnership will hopefully result in the first ever “South African Students Fashion Week”.

Student warns of con man using fake cocaine for scam

A Braamfontein student has warned others about being vigilant of a Nigerian con man who offers money in exchange for safeguarding his  fake cocaine.

Jabulani Makoko*, a student at the Auckland Park AFDA found himself in a scam earlier yesterday when he agreed to safeguard 2kg of what appeared to be cocaine.

Makoko said that he was sitting by the stairs of the building opposite the Pick n’ Pay on Jorissen Street, in Braamfontein, waiting for a friend.

After a while a well-dressed Nigerian man came up to him, saying he needed help.

“I believe him yeah! Cause hey man he has the money here and he has 2kg of coke, which you’re not gonna leave with anybody, that’s worth a lot of money! So I trust him.”

Makoko said the man explained that he desperately needed his phone to make a call to meet a ‘white dude’ who would be upstairs in the building.

“I believe him yeah! Cause hey man he has the money here and he has 2kg of coke, which you’re not gonna leave with anybody, that’s worth a lot of money! So I trust him,” said Makoko.

The man offered Makoko R500 to hold the cocaine which he would pay the student when he returned. Makoko says he was “desperate for the money man! I was broke. And the guy came up to me now and made it sound so legit, here’s R500 bucks in cold hard cash.”

Makoko then gave him his cellphone, and the Nigerian man made a phone call in front of Makoko. The Nigerian man then said he needed to move closer to wherever the ‘white man’ would be watching him and he moved closer towards the street.

Makoko now says that was ‘my biggest mistake.’

Makoko says he was too busy looking at the ‘coke’ anxious about what he had gotten himself into, and not so far away from him were two female metro cops. Makoko says that’s when he began to panic but decided to remain silent.

“What if this is something that could possibly go wrong and I’m implicated in this,” said Maloko.

After 20 minutes Makoko realised the man was gone and after 30 minutes Makoko said he began to believe that the man is not coming back. After an hour Makoko says, “That’s when it hit me that ok this guy is not coming back and maybe this is not real coke.”

When Makoko’s friend arrived he related the whole story to her and she said to him there’s no possible way that someone would leave that much cocaine with him.

After two hours Makoko checked the bag of cocaine to discover cake flour, he then called his phone and it had been switched off. Makoko said he had assumed the cocaine was real.

“[I didn’t] really look at it to analyse if its baking powder or the real deal. You just know if it’s a Nigerian dude, it’s got to be real.”

Makoko said he was still fearful when he left the bag of ‘cocaine’ where he had been sitting.

Makoko said that the same con happened to a friend in Milpark.

*Names have been changed.