Witsie bail-out

Wits Legal Office bails students out of holding cells when they get arrested, even though they are not legally obligated to do so.
The legal office particularly assists students whose parents and guardians live far away. This practice has received mixed signals from Witsies though.

Witsie response

Some Witsies told Wits Vuvuzela they were upset there was a budget for bailing students out when many students faced financial difficulties.
“I find the bail thing very, very weird. Bail is a personal thing. There are so many students who are struggling financially and there are other needs such as fixing buildings,” said Nyakallo Motloung, 2nd year BADA.

[pullquote]

“People don’t have the cash and you could get arrested if you are innocent.”

 

[/pullquote]

On the other hand, Stu Watt, 3rd year BA Fine Art, said he thought it was a fantastic thing: “Ja, it is good. People don’t have the cash and you could get arrested if you are innocent.”

Wits Legal Office response 

According to Wits Legal Office adviser Tasneem Wadvalla, the practice of bailing out Witsies is rare.
“If it’s our student and we can assist, we assist. That is what you need to know. We are here to assist students in so far as possible.”
Wadvalla said the reason the legal office assisted students with bail was that students did not have the money to cover bail.
“We do not judge the merits of that basis, we are not saying ‘yes, by us assisting you, you are not

guilty’.
“We don’t delve into the issue. We don’t go into that detail. It is simply assisting our students in so far as possible.”
The legal office also steps in to verify that students do in fact belong to the Wits community. This verification assists with reflecting that students are not a flight risk.

[pullquote align=”right”]”It is simply assisting our students in so far as possible.” [/pullquote]

Injustice
Ruth Hopkins, a senior journalist at the Wits Justice Project, recently wrote an article in The Star that focused on the conditions in holding cells for prisoners awaiting trial and about abusive police officers.
“For the university to assist students with bail is actually fantastic. This is because there is much corruption in the justice system and the conditions of holding cells are appalling,” Hopkins said.
Hopkins’s article highlighted how many of the police service’s arrests are unjustified and random. It described how Steven Mothao was randomly stopped by the police and taken to a holding cell for no apparent reason.
“While onlookers gawked, the police officers slammed Mothao into a police van.

[pullquote]“I find the bail thing very, very weird.”[/pullquote] “He was detained in a police cell for 22 hours. For the first 14, he wasn’t offered a glass of water. Then Mothao was out on the street again.
“The police officers never identified themselves, they did not have an arrest warrant and and they did not inform Mothao of the reasons for his arrest.”

An indictment against Wits admin

The Legal Office, nor Employee Relations, should deal with sexual harassment, the report by Norton Rose and the Centre for Applied Legal Studies recommended last week.
This was revealed in the final sexual harassment report. The report also said that some sexual harassment complainants were told, “you realise if you go ahead with this you’ll be ruining this person’s life; are you prepared to do that?”.

[pullquote]“you realise if you go ahead with this you’ll be ruining this person’s life; are you prepared to do that?”.[/pullquote] The report revealed that both offices are conflicted and this compromises their ability to combat sexual harassment on campus.
“In our view the Legal Office is simply tasked with too many disparate roles to address sexual harassment claims comprehensively,” the report suggested.

The Legal Office and Employee Relations were exposed for not having any expertise or training in the field of sexual harassment or gender issues.
“The perception is that it is not necessary for specialists to be brought in to handle these matters, either because they are not important, or because the Legal Office currently consists largely of female attorneys, and it is believed that sexual harassment is a ‘woman’s issue’, which can be handled by any woman,” read the report.

Three particular areas were highlighted as competing interests for the Legal Office in sexual harassment issues: the university’s reputation, the complainant’s interests and the interests of the alleged perpetrator.

The report also perceived that there was a universal view that the Legal Office did not pursue difficult cases.

Complainants reported that they feel as if their issues vanished into a “black hole”.
However, the report did concede that the Legal Office had good intentions. The Legal Office’s mixed response to sexual harassment was “the result of an immeasurable overload of responsibility on the Legal Office, coupled with deficient training”.

The report found that the sexual harassment approach of the Legal Office is one which is “overly legalistic”.
In addition, staff members complained that the Legal Office told them not to speak to students about sexual harassment.
The inquiry recommended that the Legal Office should be restricted to dealing solely with the university’s interests.

Legal Office response

Prof Andrew Crouch, the Deputy Vice-Chancellor: Academic responded as follows: “My colleagues at the Legal Office and I fully support the principles which underlie the Report on Sexual Harassment released on the 4th of September 2013.

We are mindful of the nuanced nature of sexual harassment.

We have always been and remain committed to assisting and supporting complainants whose matters fall under my jurisdiction.”

[pullquote align=”right”]Complainants reported that they feel as if their issues vanished into a “black hole”.[/pullquote]

Prof Crouch added that the legal office supports complainants throughout and calls upon psychiatrists where necessary as well as, “implement practical measures to keep the complainant and accused apart from each other while the relevant process unfolds”.

Employee relations

The report revealed that the uncertainty between the role players was plentiful as to who was responsible for investigating claims of sexual harassment.
“These conflicting roles lead to a perception that the Employment Relations Office may encourage students to report but the Office is not available to support students through the process,” the report reflected.

In conclusion the report recommended that the Employee Relations office should not deal with sexual harassment because of the conflicted roles.

The report also revealed that intuition was used when dealing with sexual harassment as opposed to a “prescribed manner”.

“Often the policy is not consistently pursued due to a lack of practicality, time and certainty”.

 

[pullquote]“Often the policy is not consistently pursued due to a lack of practicality, time and certainty”.[/pullquote]

Lack of resources was another factor in the poor response as there were only two human resource officials at Wits.

“Various persons, who came before the inquiry, expressed the view that Employment Relations indicated that they were burdened by their complaints and did not do their best to deal with the matter.”

The inquiry also received complaints that communication involving follow-ups was reported as inconsistent or absent. The report highlighted inconsistencies, lack of co-ordination, lack of training on the issue, and a lack of resources.

RELATED ARTICLES:

Wits Vuvuzela: Wits Legal Office “gags” politics department. March 12, 2013

Day 3: SRC Elections – PYA celebs booted

TELEVISION personality Pearl Thusi (@PearlThusi) and youth activist Shaka Sisulu (@shakasisulu) were prevented from distributing Progressive Youth Alliance (PYA) election material on campus today.

The celebrity duo was invited by the PYA to encourage Wits students to participate in this year’s elections. “We encourage Wits students to vote. Once they vote, they will make the wise choice,” Sisulu said.

 Threats of disqualification 

Chief electoral officer Jabu Mashinini stopped the duo and threatened that if they continued to campaign, the PYA would be disqualified from the elections.

“The rule says only students can campaign. This is Wits University, don’t campaign for them. They cannot approach students. I don’t want this debate,” Mashinini shouted at the two visitors. Mashinini also said Thusi and Sisulu’s presence is seen as campaigning for the PYA, which would give the organisation an advantage in the elections.

Mashinini added: “You can’t bring people to campaign, as they will get an advantage. Only Wits students can campaign, it’s part of an election rule. I will disqualify them and this is a last warning.”

[pullquote]“The rule says only students can campaign. This is Wits University, don’t campaign for them. They cannot approach students. I don’t want this debate”[/pullquote]

Roping in Thusi and Sisulu did not bode well for the opposition organisations, who accused the PYA of using under-handed tactics by bringing influential people to campus.

Opposition organisations react

A group of PYA candidates argued that anyone in a democratic country can bring anyone to campaign, as “all of the organisations have been doing dirty things”.

They also accused Project W of buying votes by allegedly awarding students couches worth “R25 000” in a bid to win the elections. They also raised concerns over Project W’s intentions to participate in the elections. Candidate for Project W, Gautam Rao, slammed the PYA’s allegations of buying votes and said “the couches were donated by corporates”.

Rao added: “We were not doing this [buying couches] for votes. We don’t need anarchy at Wits. Anarchy will not help this university. We were told to abide by [election] rules when we joined the campaign. We need to bring integrity back to Wits.”

Democratic Alliance Student Organisation (Daso) candidate, Rebone Segopolo, also weighed in by criticising the PYA’s election move. “How do you bring Pearl Thusi? They should have brought a Wits alumnus, someone more relevant,” Segopolo said.

 Last day of the elections

Today marks the last day of this year’s SRC elections. According to presiding election officer, Nosi Sosibo, the votes will be counted overnight. She also said an indication cannot be given as to which organisation is leading in the election race. “Last year was busier than this year. Last year was worse,” Sosibo gave an indication on voter turnout. The election results will be announced tomorrow.

RELATED ARTICLES:

Wits Vuvuzela, Day 2: SRC elections, August 29, 2013

Wits Vuvuzela, Day 1 of SRC elections 2013, August 28, 2013

Wits Vuvuzela, VIDEO VOX: What are Witsies voting for? August 28, 2013

WITH GALLERY: The 1913 Land Act realised through photos

A crowd of eager art lovers could not resist the magnetism of the historical photographic archive dating back to the 1800’s and commemorating the 1913 Land Act.

The exhibition Umhlaba 1913-2013: Commemorating the 1913 Land Act opened this week at the Gertrude Posel Core Gallery in the Wits Art Museum.

1913 Land Act

This year  marks 100 years since the 1913 Land Act was passed. The act helped to successfully disenfranchise indigenous South African’s in terms of land ownership and its repercussions are still felt today.

[pullquote align=”right”]”No single photographic exhibition could illustrate the full diversity of our complex realities”[/pullquote]

Curator of the Umhlaba Exhibiton, Bongi Dhlomo-Matloa said that the exhibition’s purpose was to help people remember their history. “Commemoration is a relative term here, we are remembering this act that left blacks with only 7% of the land,” she said. Dhlomo-Matloa coincidently wore a black and white ensemble matching the monochromatic nature of most of the photographs on display. She said it was merely a coincidence but nonetheless she carried the colours of our history around her neck and on her shoulders.

Remembering history

Next to the exhibition’s entrance was a plaque detailing the aims, limitations and history behind the curation. “No single photographic exhibition could illustrate the full diversity of our complex realities,” but this by no means, kept the artist/photographer from making an attempt  to illustrate those complex realities.

This history could not only be seen, but was also heard as  jazz, afro-soul and choral music ushered people up the ramp and along the walls of the gallery. It was quite jarring  to hear the juxtaposition between Miriam Makeba’s voice sing Gauteng and then immediately after, a choir sing Die Stem, while standing at the wall with all the apartheid-era photography on it.

Photographic reality

[pullquote]“Commemoration is a relative term here, we are remembering this act that left blacks with only 7% of the land”[/pullquote] Dlomo-Matloa went on to say that these photos were used as they “are very exact” and can therefore accurately depict the reality they captured. The first colour picture seen in the gallery was on the apartheid wall, a photograph by David Goldblatt. It was taken in 1987 at a resettlement camp in the Wittlesea district of the then Ciskei.

Fourth year photography student Melissa Bennett, said  she loved how the photos told a story of overcoming boundaries. She was also particularly intrigued by the way the photos had been arranged  according to a historical timeline.

Dhlomo-Matloa said that the exhibition  was displayed in chronological sequence laid out in a timeline to reflect how things and people changed as time went on. Although a huge amount of images were available, budget and space constraints restricted how many photographs could be exhibited.

The photography on display showcases some of the most talented photographers in the country, like Peter MagubanePaul Weinburg and Ingrid Hudson.

After a walk about the whole gallery, the reality of our history was more than apparent. The exhibition will be on display until January 2014.

Watch the video below in which curator Dhlomo-Matloa talks about the exhibition:

 

RELATED ARTICLES: 

 

The spook wrote my matric

ACCUSED NUMBER 35: Elizabeth Mpofu displays the charge sheet that her accounting exam had an irregularity. Photo: Mia Swart

ACCUSED NUMBER 35: Elizabeth Mpofu displays the charge sheet
that her accounting exam had an irregularity. Photo: Mia Swart

By Nolwazi Mjwara and Mia Swart

A WITSIE is a year behind in her studies because her former school was involved in the first matricm exam fraud in the history of the Gauteng department of education (GDE) to involve ghost writers.

Elizabeth Mpofu, 2nd year LLB, was one of the “35 to 40” students who had irregularities in their final matric examinations. While she and the other students wrote their exams in good faith, their former schools had allegedly brought in other people to write exams under their names.

The two implicated schools, Robin Hood College and Vine College in the Johannesburg CBD, are private independent schools with the same director. Both receive larger government subsidies if their final matric pass rates are high.

[pullquote align=”right”]“Up until today we do not know what really happened to our original scripts, and the matter has been swept under the carpet for far too long now.”[/pullquote]

 Wits Vuvuzela was not able to obtain comment from the director of the two schools at the time of going to press. His cellphone message told callers that he was currently out of the country.

Not guilty

Mpofu wrote her matric in 2010 at Vine College and passed all her subjects -except for one.

“Well, when the results came out in 2011, I got the shock of my life. My accounting results had been blocked as a result of an irregularity I had allegedly committed.”

All the students affected by the fraud were initially called to face charges of irregularities before the GDE, but were found not guilty.

Mpofu was only permitted to rewrite her accounting exam at the end of 2011. She obtained a result of 79%.“Up until today we do not know what really happened to our original scripts, and the matter has been swept under the carpet for far too long now.”

Approached for comment, GDE spokesperson, Gershwin Chuenyane, said it had been recommended that the candidates’ marks be declared null and void and that the principal and all the educators from the two colleges be suspended from conducting any examination activities. The schools had to be de-registered as examination centres.

The GDE has taken over all examination activities and administration of the National Senior Certificate exams at the two colleges since 2011. But Chuenyane said the GDE could not institute charges against the principals and educators of Vine and Robin Hood Independent Schools because “they were not employed in terms of the Employment of Educators’ Act”.

Mpofu said: “I have since tried getting some legal advice from the Wits Law Clinic and I have been told that I can’t open a case without the final report of the investigation.”

Intimidated learners

Another former pupil affected by the fraud, Nonhlanhla Siwela, said she too had to wait an entire year to re-write her examination.

Siwela had two blocked subjects:physical science and life sciences.

The principal of the school in 2011, a “Mr Sibanda”, was present at her disciplinary hearing. “He told us to tell the board that the papers did belong to us. We all knew that they did not belong to us because the handwriting did not match our own.

“He also said that the department of education was racist and that they were jealous of the schools because they were private.”

Siwela said they were upset that the department had not told the former learners what action had been taken against the schools and their staff. They feared the evidence had been destroyed.

Another affected learner who studied at Vine College, Thabitha Ndlovu, discovered during the GDE’s investigation that three subjects, life sciences, physics and mathematics had been written for her. The ghost writers had passed the subjects with results of over 60%.

VIDEO: Melinda Bam at Wits

Former Miss South Africa Melinda Bam was the keynote speaker at Wits’s Student Development and Leadership Unit (SDLU)’s networking connection seminar on Wednesday. Bam spoke to students about the importance of networking and also following their passions. Bam said she was passionate about inspiring young women. Bam who is also part of the National Executive for the Miss South Africa pageant encouraged Witsies to enter this year’s pageant.

Camera and Voice over
Shandukani Mulaudzi

Editor and Script writer
Nokuthula Manyathi

Interviewer
Nolwazi Mjwara

WITH GALLERY: Melinda Bam talks passion

Melinda Bam decided she would be Miss South Africa before she submitted her entry form.

The cum laude BCom Marketing graduate turned business woman, told Witsies that it was important to write your goals down and commit to them. Bam addressed students and media at the first Network Connections event held by the Student Development and Leadership Unit (SDLU) at Café Fino last night.

[pullquote]“You all have so many contacts on your phones, twitter and other social networks right? But how many of those have turned into a job or a bursary or a book?” [/pullquote]

Early tragedy

Bam told the guests that her father’s suicide when she was eleven forced her to reflect on the person she wanted to be.

“I initially thought that I would probably have ‘daddy issues’ or that my reaction to it would have made me the perfect muse for artists and musicians from the experience,” she said.

She told the audience that her grandfather’s quote  helped her tremendously in dealing with difficult experiences in life: “’You are not a product of your circumstance but a product of choice,’ is what my grandpa told me.”

Networking

Nicole Msomi, student development practitioner told the guests that the purpose of “Network Connections” was to create a space for students to engage with influential individuals who attended the events.

“You all have so many contacts on your phones, twitter and other social networks right? But how many of those have turned into a job or a bursary or a book?” she asked the Witsies.

Msomi added that the events aimed to inspire Witsies to network more effectively and maintain long lasting networks.

Bam also told the audience that one of the activities at the Miss South Africa qualifiers included a networking challenge at an event. If entrants had not collected five business cards by the end of it, they had failed.

Wanting something more

Bam told Witsies that when she was in first year in 2008 she wanted “something more” and wanted to break through mediocrity.

[pullquote align=”right”]“We are all diamonds, you just need to refine and polish what you already are.”[/pullquote]

The former beauty queen told the audience that when she watched her mom, who is a gospel singer and public speaker, perform, she realised that she also wanted to give back in her own way: “We are all diamonds, you just need to refine and polish what you already are.”

Grass isn’t always greener

Bam said when she was younger she moved to China to pursue a modelling career. She also wanted to move to get out of her bubble that she had known in Pretoria.

“I thought the grass would be greener on the other side, but there wasn’t even a lot of grass when I got to China!” she said.

The power of Women

Bam shed some insight on being a woman this women’s month. She said that in our modern world women often felt  pressure to live in a man’s world and change to fit into that world. “Why do we want to change to be something that we are not? We are not men we are 100% women. We must be the best version of what we already are. It is a strength that we are 100% women not a weakness.”

@Nolwazi_Mjwara


 

Transie Missions

Witsies use various modes of transport to travel to and from campus everyday. Some take 15 minute walks, while others have to travel for up to two hours. Wits Vuvuzela went out to bus stops, popular taxi pick up points, pedestrian crossings and trains stations to find out how the commute is for students and staff.

A day in the life 

Witsie Yusuf Bapeekee at the Braamfontein train station. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

Witsie Yusuf Bapeekee at the Braamfontein train station. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

Yusuf Bapeekee used to travel by motor bike when he lived in the West Rand near Kagiso. He recently moved to Mayfair and now walks daily to and from campus. [pullquote align=”right”]“I normally leave campus around 3.30, [but] because it’s Ramadan I leave around 1.15, after prayers.”[/pullquote]

“I never see anything out of the ordinary… just small school kids that walk free not scared. I see them and I feel free.”

Bapeekee said it took him “half hour tops” to make the commute. He said he left home at 7.15am. “I try to be early for my lectures”, he said as a smile grew across face.

“I normally leave campus around 3.30, [but] because it’s Ramadan I leave around 1.15, after prayers.”

Bapeekee said he enjoyed the walk. “It’s free to walk, plus it’s exercise.”

Asked about the crime associated with route around Enoch Sontonga Avenue, Bapeekee said:

“If I saw more students I’d feel even better.”

Walk on by 

Ntombi Mbatha carefully crosses the street. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

Ntombi Mbatha carefully crosses the street. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

A short brisk walk is all it takes for Ntombi Mbatha, 1st year BHSc, to get to and from campus. She lives at a Southpoint building just two blocks away from campus.

Even though her journey is uncomplicated she nearly got hit by a taxi once. She said that experience has made her think more than twice before crossing the street now.

She is fascinated by the high school students she passes on her way because they remind her of her days as one of them.

Ntombi feels very safe walking in Braamfontein.

“I went downtown once and it was just such a mess, Braam is better,” she said.

 

Ngake Mukgowane rushing to catch his train home. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

Ngake Mukgowane rushing to catch his train home. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

 Staff travels

Students aren’t the only ones who have to commute to and from Wits. Staff members also have their own transport missions.

Ngake Mukgowane is a Wits staff member who uses the train to commute.

He leaves his home in Dobsonville at 5.30am every morning and has to travel for about an hour and a half to reach Braamfontein station.

Mukgowane has been working at Wits for 18 years and has been a train commuter for most of those years.

He was in a rush to catch his 4pm train when Wits Vuvuzela reporters found him.

60 minute trip

John Malungani shows us how to call a taxi. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

John Malungani shows us how to call a taxi. Photo: Pheladi Sethusa

John Malungani, 1st year BSc Com Sci,

has to commute for at least one hour a day to get to campus.

He says that he is more than willing to make the trip because of the good reputation that Wits has.

John lives in Tembisa. There is no taxi that comes straight from there to Wits, so he has to walk for another 15 minutes once he reaches Noord taxi rank.

He wishes he lived a little closer so that he could work and study till late on campus like other students.

“It’s hard travelling for two hours a day,” said Malungani.

@pheladi_s

Brown wins Heather Martienssen art prize

Kirsty Morrison’s piece The Cut (2013). Attendees were invited to cut the artist's hair at the Wits Art Museum on Wednesday Night. Photo: Shandukani Mulaudzi

Kirsty Morrison’s piece The Cut (2013). Attendees were invited to cut the artist’s hair at the Wits Art Museum on Wednesday Night. Photo: Shandukani Mulaudzi

The Wits School of Arts held the Heather Martienssen art exhibition at the Wits Art Museum (WAM) last night.

The Heather Martienssen prize is an annual award presented to a senior Wits Fine Arts student.The winning artist was Antonia Brown,  3rd year Fine Arts, for her piece titled I will tell him when he comes back.

Brown studied in Edinburgh, Scotland, before coming to the Wits School of Arts this year.

The prize is considered to be indicative of a potentially prosperous artistic career.

The Martienssen prize of 2010 was held at Museum Africa in Newtown. Hosting the art competition at Museum Africa was  strategic, as it was an attempt to build relations with Johannesburg’s cultural institutions.

The 2011 prize was held at the Wits Substation gallery. Last year saw the exhibition at the then, recently opened WAM.

Merit awards were awarded to Daniella Dagnin for Relational Time and Enjay Ndlovu for his piece entitled It looked so much better in my mind.

Dagnin’s piece involved her sitting in WAM from early in the day until the time of the exhibition.

When Wits Vuvuzela arrived at the exhibition she had been sitting for seven hours.

 

CJC students eviction: update

College students who were evicted from their residence in Bramley last week landed up in crowded accommodation after waiting all day. Some students could not get transport to campus and as a result missed tests on Friday.

The Central Johannesburg College (CJC) students were evicted last Tuesday morning by the landlord from their Student Village residential Complex.  After CJC fell into arrears for their accomodation according to Aengus Investment properties (AIP).

Inga Matsitsela, a former Bramley resident, told Wits Vuvuzela that he had to sleep in a two-bedroom apartment with four other students following the eviction.

[pullquote]”After all of that I had to sleep in a two bedroom with four other guys,” [/pullquote]

“We waited until late on Tuesday night to get a place to stay. We waited outside Aengus from the morning already. After all of that I had to sleep in a two bedroom with four other guys,” Matsitsela said.

AIP management told Wits Vuvuzela that while the students were evicted from Bramley they were not left homeless.

“AIP ensured that all the affected students were relocated to safe, modern, convenient accommodation in the area.”

Management from AIP added that they were sensitive to the fact that many students were writing tests and exams and that they had tried their best to make sure that minimal disruption occurred.

Matsitsela and other former Bramley residents were moved to Langlaagte, near Soweto. Students had to organise their own transport to college until Friday.

Buses were organised for Friday but arrived late in the day. As a result, Henrich Makuwa missed his end of term mathematics test.

According to a notice by Aengus, students were evicted because of non-payment.

The notice by Aengus to CJC students read as follows: “Please be advised that your institution has failed to pay your accommodation in spite of numerous attempts by yourselves to secure payment.”

The students found this notice the morning of their eviction and had received no prior warning.

“We have received no apology or anything from anyone for the mess that has happened,” said Matsitsela.

Some students have managed to return to Bramley, while others such as Makuwa and Matsitsela are still staying in Langlaagte.

Students who moved back to Bramley said improvements were made to some of the broken doors in the residence.

The first CJC eviction article

ray@witsvuvuzelacom

nolwazi@witsvuvuzela.com

CJC students evicted

Students queue outside the Aengus offices in Braamfontein waiting for accomodation. Photo:Ray Mahlaka

Students queue outside Aengus offices in Braamfontein for accomodation. Photo:Ray Mahlaka

by Ray Mahlaka and Nolwazi Mjwara

SOME Central Johannesburg College (CJC) students with their scant belongings flooded Aengus Investment Properties offices in the hope of finding accommodation this afternoon.

CJC students seeking accommodation were met by a notice which read: “Please be advised that your institution has failed to pay your accommodation in spite of numerous attempts by ourselves to secure payment.”

“The landlord kicked us out and we were moved to Braamfontein where we were told Aengus [Investment Properties] will find us alternative accommodation,” said a student who asked to remain anonymous.

Other students were fortunate to arrange alternative accommodation, and arranged to have a vehicle usher them to their new homes.

Students transported to their alternative accomodation. Photo: Ray Mahlaka

Students cram their belongings into a van. Photo: Ray Mahlaka

Wits Vuvuzela was asked to leave the premises when photographing students who queued outside Aengus offices and employees declined to comment on accommodation issues.

Students said they had been waiting outside the offices since 8am for updates about their accommodation.

Inga Matsitsela, who was evicted said he was not sure where he was going to sleep tonight. He added that CJC has failed them.

Students with their belongings on the street. Photo:Ray Mahlaka

Students with their belongings on the street. Photo:Ray Mahlaka

Earlier this year Wits Vuvuzela reported on protests by CJC students, as they accused Aengus Property Holdings of favouring Wits students who allegedly paid more for rent.

CJC students said they lived at Bramley building before their eviction.

“Our landlord said they don’t want to see us there, then transport came and brought us to Aengus offices. We had to queue this morning and only allocated accommodation if we appeared on the Aengus list”, said another student.

The Aengus list refers to students who have covered by CJC in terms of acommodation list for according to some of the students queuing outside Aengus offices.

The names of students are allocated accomodation are read out in the "Aengus  list". Photo: Ray Mahlaka

The names of students are allocated accomodation are read out in the “Aengus list”. Photo: Ray Mahlaka

“I still have exams at school, now I have to worry about accommodation problems,” expressed an angry student who declined to be named.

Related article:

Wits Vuvuzela: Wits students butt heads with Aengus