The struggles of studying abroad.

THIRD-year student Rosa Moll studied abroad in Paris as part of an exchange programme to broaden her horizons. However, when Moll returned to Wits she learned she was not being credited for all of her courses.

Moll took up seven subjects in the fields of archaeology and anthropology at a third year at the Paris X Nanterre La Defense in France. The courses at the French university were to be credited at a second year level at Wits.

Ismail Barudin, programme administrator at the Wits International Office, told Wits Vuvuzela that Moll’s case was being investigated. He said the error was not done on the Wits side and suggested a mistake was made by Paris X Nanterre.

Barudin said that when students apply for the Wits Study Abroad Programme, it is important that they sit down with their faculty registrar and look at the courses they plan on taking at the foreign university.
The students should make sure that the course is available and that they will be credited for their courses before they study abroad. A form approving the courses at the exchange university must be checked and stamped by the faculty registrar.

Barudin said students need to be aware that some courses are only partially credited, and exchange students would still have to take up another course at Wits to fulfil their point requirements.
One of the requirements of the programme is that a student needs to be registered at Wits and pay the full tuition fee at the university. In cases where the academic year at the exchange university does not coincide with the Wits academic year, students should register over the phone while still abroad.
Most of the partnerships and exchange programmes are open to the humanities students.
Barudin explained that it is difficult to have exchange programmes in faculties that have their own professional councils because there could be a difference in the way the professions are practised in different countries.

Barudin said that cases such as Moll’s are not common and that they have not come across any other issues.
Other than then credits mishap, Moll said “the experience was memorable” and that she enjoyed her studying in Paris.

Witsies rock the runway

AN UNLIKELY TRIO: Three Witsies strutted their stuff on a fashion runway at the launch of the Candid Devout clothing line on Saturday night atb the Gardens rooftop venue in downtown Joburg. Photo: Nomatter Ndebele

AN unlikely trio of two civil engineering students and a law student were strutting on a runway at the launch of the Candid Devout clothing line.

Carmen Mathlakola and Luyanda Mkhize, both 2nd year Civil engineering students and Candy Khoza 2nd year LLB student walked the catwalk on Saturday night at the Gardens Rooftop venue.
Not your typical models, Mathlakola believed that they were not selected to model the brand because they had the” typical model look”, but because they represented the brand. Candid Devout “is for any girl, tall or short” said Mathlakola.

Khoza believes people often think when you look a certain way; you have to be in a certain career. Although Khoza is shorter than the average ramp model she said her height worked in her favour, as she was able to wear clothes that taller girls couldn’t really pull off.

Cathy Moloi, the brains behind the clothing line says it’s all about “authentic trends, with the latest trends recurring, making it very dynamic, basically swag means it speaks for itself”. The line was well-received as the audience marvelled at the vintage chic pieces, mixed with a classic African print influence.

The star-studded audience included the likes of SABC 2 Hectic Nine-9, Raphael Griffiths and International pop star, Michaela.

One does not realise how much work goes into putting together a fashion show. The audience was treated to a glitch-free fashion show, but the girls said there was “madness” in the backroom, as “one girl almost went out in her bra” said Mkhize.

For the engineering duo, the fashion show gave them a break from their “hectic” course and an opportunity to be in the limelight, “that [attention from people] doesn’t happen in engineering” said Mathlakola.
Khoza,a VowFm Dj and self-confessed drama queen is used to getting attention from family and friends. For her the experience was all about learning the ins and outs of how modelling works. She aspires to be in the fashion Industry one day as “it was nice to get the experience of the runway (sic)” said Khoza.
Although none of the girls have ambitions of taking up modelling as a career, they agreed that if the opportunity arose, they would do it again.

Witsies rock the runway

Carmen Matlhako, Luyanda Mkhize and Candy Khoza, walked at the launch of Candid Devout's clothing line.

Carmen Matlhako, Luyanda Mkhize and Candy Khoza, walked at the launch of Candid Devout’s clothing line.

AN unlikely trio of two civil engineering students and a law student were strutting on a runway at the launch of the Candid Devout clothing line.

Carmen Mathlakola and Luyanda Mkhize, both 2nd year Civil engineering students and Candy Khoza 2nd year LLB student walked the catwalk on Saturday night at the Gardens Rooftop venue.
Not your typical models, Mathlakola believed that they were not selected to model the brand because they had the” typical model look”, but because they represented the brand. Candid Devout “is for any girl, tall or short” said Mathlakola.

Khoza believes people often think when you look a certain way; you have to be in a certain career. Although Khoza is shorter than the average ramp model she said her height worked in her favour, as she was able to wear clothes that taller girls couldn’t really pull off.

Cathy Moloi, the brains behind the clothing line says it’s all about “authentic trends, with the latest trends recurring, making it very dynamic, basically swag means it speaks for itself”. The line was well-received as the audience marvelled at the vintage chic pieces, mixed with a classic African print influence. The star-studded audience included the likes of SABC 2 Hectic Nine-9, Raphael Griffiths and International pop star, Michaela.

One does not realise how much work goes into putting together a fashion show. The audience was treated to a glitch-free fashion show, but the girls said there was “madness” in the backroom, as “one girl almost went out in her bra” said Mkhize.

For the engineering duo, the fashion show gave them a break from their “hectic” course and an opportunity to be in the limelight, “that [attention from people] doesn’t happen in engineering” said Mathlakola.
Khoza,a VowFm Dj and self-confessed drama queen is used to getting attention from family and friends. For her the experience was all about learning the ins and outs of how modelling works. She aspires to be in the fashion Industry one day as “it was nice to get the experience of the runway (sic)” said Khoza.
Although none of the girls have ambitions of taking up modelling as a career, they agreed that if the opportunity arose, they would do it again.

Nomatter@witsvuvuzela.com

Witsies are Beliebers too

By Nomatter Ndebele, Nolwazi Mjwara and Ray Mahlaka.
International sensation Justin Bieber is currently in South Africa, on his Believe tour. He is performing in Johannesburg this Sunday. Wits Vuvuzela scoured the campus for Beliebers among witsies to find out what all the hype is about.

Illegal Wits merchandise for sale

One of the Braamfontein res jackets for sale at a store in Lagos.

One of the Braamfontein res jackets for sale at a store in Lagos, downtown Johannesburg. Pic: Wits Vuvuzela.

A STORE in the “Lagos” section of Braamfontein is selling Wits merchandise without the university’s permission.

Wits Vuvuzela found the goods at a store on the corner of Simmonds and Jorissen streets, in an area known as “Lagos” due to the large number of Nigerian merchants. The reporter was accompanied by a fellow student posing as her boyfriend.

Inside the shop, five Wits Braamfontein Centre res jackets were for sale at R400 each. The blue and white baseball jackets have the Wits logo on their sleeve. The jackets are only put out in the late evenings, and are nowhere to be seen in the morning or during the day. [pullquote align=”right”]”they were under the impression that the first batch of jackets had then been discarded.”[/pullquote]

The jackets had names of various people on them, written in ink, with the one reading “S’khu chairperson”. The vendor told the Wits Vuvuzela reporter they had made 150 jackets for Wits.

He added that he could make more of the jackets for us, if we wanted them. When asked if the names could be removed the salesman said this was no problem, all he had to do was wipe it off with some remover.

Wits spokesperson Shirona Patel said Wits branded merchandise could only be sold at the shop in the concourse of Senate House.

“Wits does not have not franchises which are allowed to sell Wits merchandise,” Patel said.

Wits Vuvuzela traced the name “S’khu” back to a former Braamfontein Centre residence chairperson, Skhulile Ngcobo.

Ngcobo said they had contracted a designer to make the jackets for them. When the first batch had come out, the jackets were incorrectly designed, so they asked for the jackets to be re-done. When they received the new jackets, they were under the impression that the first batch of jackets had then been discarded.
While the jackets were being sold for R400.00, the salesman offered a discount, saying he could sell the reporter three jackets for R380.00 each.

The man urged the reporter and her “boyfriend” to come back and buy the jackets as they were selling fast. He suggested that they leave a deposit, so that he could hold them on their behalf.

Excluding exclusions

The members of the SEBS Committee

The members of the SEBS Committee

Last week Thursday, the SEBS committee held an exclusion briefing for 1st years, at the new Commerce building on West campus.
The briefing informed the students about the possibilities of financial and academic exclusion. Former SRC president Tebogo Thothela advised the students, on the importance of making an effort to consult with their lecturers and to ask for help before it’s too late. Justice Nkomo, treasurer of the SRC encouraged the students to come forward and ask for financial assistance as they have the means to put people in contact with financial sponsors. Academic officer Imaan Carrim told the students that the briefing was not about telling them what to do after exclusion, but rather to help them prevent exclusion.

Bring a can if you can

Winners of the talent show. From the left: Mokopi 3rd place, (poetry recital),1st place Wits movers(Dance).2nd place Wellem (Classical recital)

Winners of the talent show.
From the left: Mokopi 3rd place, (poetry recital),1st place Wits movers(Dance).2nd place Wellem (Classical recital)

THE Education student council (ESC) held a talent show “Bring a can if you can campaign” at Linder Auditorium, on education campus, earlier this week.This was an awareness campaign, in order to help students at the campus who are from disadvantaged backgrounds and cannot afford to get food.

Incoming chairperson Mpmelelo Sangweni said, the event was also to promote the education campus as it is often “Not taken as a wits school”.Former Vice chairperson of the ESC Njabulo Mkhize raised the same concern when he said,“There is a general view that the bachelor of education course is easy and studied by ‘less smart’ people. Education Campus has a history of being silent and boring thus many education students (all the way from first year) are disgruntled when seeing the comparison between main and education campus.
Sangweni said, they hoped to attract a lot of people from main campus, so that they would bring a can of food with them for their campaign, hence the affordable price. The entrance fee charged to watch the contest was R10.
Sangweni said the cans collected would be distributed to less fortunate students, as identified by Mr Zungu, head of student affairs.

Vukile Junior Kamtala, 1st year education, said the event would not only help the energy of the campus, but also help the less fortunate. He also said, although the talent show was somewhat of an “Informal” fundraiser, it would still make a difference.“You don’t have to know where it’s coming from, but someone out there cares” he said.

Kamtala will be one of the students benefiting from the campaign and to this he responded, “I pass off as a well spoken person, but that doesn’t mean I can support myself – its all about humanity”.
The show had 20 contestants, who were judged by SRC Treasurer Justice Nkomo, VoW Fm DJ Sam Kaase, Dj Mlungu as well as Musician Psyfo.

The winners of the show were Makopi who came in third, reciting a poem. Willem came in second after a classic rendition, while Wits movers took first place after bringing down the house with their pantsula / kwaito dance routine.

Wits student graduates against all odds

Sisanda Msekele pictured here with her guide dog Romy. Photo provided.

Sisanda Msekele pictured here with her guide dog Romy. Photo provided.

ALL that Wits graduate Sisanda Msekele, 23 wants to see when she gets her eyesight back is herself and all the people that matter most to her.

Despite losing her eyesight from Stevens Johnson’s syndrome when the medication she was prescribed damaged her cornea she has triumphed over adversity by graduating.
Coming to Wits University was a challenge for Sisanda, she had just turned blind and suddenly had to adapt to a university environment as “everything was new and overwhelming”. It was a difficult transition, after being in high school where everybody else was blind. Sisanda came to Wits and had to learn how interact with people who could see.

When Sisanda was in Matric she had applied to do medicine and was in the process of being accepted. Her hopes were dashed after losing her sight, when she had to enrol into a special school where she had to change her subjects and consequently her dreams of being a doctor. “ It’s a challenge, competing with people that can see…You never always get what you want, but you can work something out, it’s all about what you make of it,” Msekele said

When she started Msekele failed her 1st psychology test and her major essay and was ready to give up. Although pursuing psychology was not her first love, Sisanda now has dreams of being a neuro psychologist, she says although the chances of her being a neuro psychologist are slim, she’d like to get into clinical psychology in the mean time.
Mseleke said that she wasn’t excited about the graduation on March 25, but when she got onto the stage she realised what a great achievement it is when she received a standing ovation from students and Academics.
“Accomplishing something yourself is great, but when other people acknowledge you, it’s amazing,” she said.
Msekele now has plans to continue her honours and Masters degree, only this time, there is a chance that she will complete the courses with her eyesight, as she is preparing to undergo a life changing operation that could restore her eyesight.

Msekle remains positive that she will be able to see again, but expressed fear that it might not happen. “It’s scary, if it (Surgery) doesn’t work, I have nothing to lose, I have high hopes of being able to see, but what if it doesn’t happen?”
With all the excitement, Msekele said that she has to be positive, but also realistic.
If the operation goes well, Sisanda will open her eyes, look into a mirror and see herself as a triumphant Wits graduate.