INFOGRAPHIC: From Wits to Sandton – what are the options?

Transport can become quite an inconvenience for students who don’t have cars.  Wits Vuvuzela investigated the different options available for students who want to travel from Wits University to Sandton.  Students approached by Wits Vuvuzela prioritised reliability, convenience and affordability when choosing a mode of transport.

The infographic shows the best possible options available to students.

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IMAGE: Tugging at Heart Strings

Photo: Sibusisiwe Nyanda

Photo: Sibusisiwe Nyanda

Tugging at Heart Strings:Aamir suleman and Vuyolwethu Mntonintshi went to Nazareth House in Yeoville For Mandela day. The Wits Business School staff traded in their proffessional suits and ties for more play-friendly gear as they enjoyed games in the sun with Nkateko Chuene(7), Reabetswe Letsoko (7),  and other Nazereth Kids. The team also brought a big Maiba cake to the festivities. Part Packs with educational toys and more sweet treats were given to the childern at the end of the eventful day

Ethiopian spaza owner kidnapped and robbed in Soweto

Early yesterday evening in Orlando East, a group of men in a mini-bus forced an Ethiopian shop owner into their vehicle, robbed him of his stock, and after driving around with him captive in the taxi eventually dropped him off in another part of Soweto.

The shopkeeper, known as Nathi in the Soweto township where he has had a spaza shop since 2011, said he was on his way from buying airtime, chips, sweets and biscuits from Bara Mall when a group of men jumped out from a white Toyota Quantum, cornered him, and forced him inside the vehicle.

“It was in front of the Somali shop that side [signalling around the corner]. I was coming from buying stock there at Bara Mall. They were waiting for me there and put me inside the taxi,” the Ethiopian national explained.

He said the men did not beat him, all they did was take his stock and the cash he had on him.

“Yah and then they dropped me off in Meadowlands. I asked somebody to help me with transport,” he said, explaining how he had managed to make it back home.

The Ethiopian national, who says he moved to South Africa because of the war in his country that made it difficult to find a job and support himself and family, was reluctant to report the incident to the police, because he felt there was nothing they could do.

In a telephone conversation Warrant Officer Mabaso, from Orlando East Police Station, said the SAPS station had not received a report of the incident and no case had been filed.

The officer did mention that he remembered two similar incidents that happened last year, one in Dube and another in Mzimhlope.

Although he could not remember the details and whether or not any suspects had been arrested, both cases involved foreign-owned spaza shops that had been robbed by men in taxi buses.

Despite the incident, Nathi had carried on trading as usual, till late into the night.

At ten in the evening his was the sole light to be seen on an otherwise dark street of lightless lamp posts.

 

 

 


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Witsies shave it off for CANSA

Wits University held its second shavathon today during lunch in front of Umthombo. Students of all faculties gathered to show their support for cancer survivors and sufferers.

‘Take Away Cancer’ is an initiative by students of Wits university who hold these events in order to raise money for cancer research with all the proceeds go to CANSA (Cancer Association of South Africa).

The shavathon attracted an equal amount of men and women. But the majority who shaved their heads were men. Women students indulged in highlighting their hair with various colours of spray. Tarryn Human, community mobiliser for the CANSA Houghton office said if women shaved their heads, their hair would be parcelled and sent to make wigs and weaves out of them for cancer patients.

After signing up take away cancer helpers gave students a pink ribbon, symbolic of cancer and more specifically breast cancer. With the ribbon came a Shavathon card which you trade in after your shave/spray and recieve a free ice-cream. Photo: Prelene Singh

All participants were  given a pink ribbon, symbolic of cancer and more specifically breast cancer. With the ribbon came a Shavathon card which was traded in after the shave/spray for a free ice-cream. Photo: Prelene Singh

 

Thomas Geffen, 2nd year BA said he was shaving his head because it was for a good cause and its worth it. Photo: Prelene Singh

Thomas Geffen, 2nd year BA said he was shaving his head because it was for a good cause and worth it.
Photo: Prelene Singh

A Wits student who shaved his head as it was a quich haircut for him and he simultaneoulsy ended up shaving his beard off as well.

A Wits student who shaved his head as it was a quick haircut for him and he simultaneoulsy ended up shaving his beard off too. Photo: Prelene Singh

 

Adrian Song, first year Biokinetics health science, decided to spray his hair in support of the Shavathon.

Adrian Song, 1st Biokinetics health science, decided to spray his hair in support of the shavathon. Photo: Prelene Singh

 

Some ladies and gentlemen decided to get creative and sprayed some interesting designs on the hair.

Some ladies and gentlemen decided to get creative and sprayed some interesting designs on the hair. Photo: Prelene Singh

 

recieving ice cream

After getting their hair sprayed or shaved, students handed in their shavathon card to the Casablanca Silly Buggers tent and were given a free ice-cream for their contribution. Photo: Prelene Singh

Thato Benedict, founder and chairman of Take Away Cancer and also a maths and economics student started this initiative after his mother passed away in 2011 from cervical cancer.

Thato Benedict, founder and chairman of Take Away Cancer and also a maths and economics Witsie started this initiative after his mother passed away in 2011 from cervical cancer. Photo: Prelene Singh

In the mission statement for Take Away Cancer it stated this initiative aims to be the equivalent of love life by 2022 said Benedict. “We aim to have a mobile clinic on campus for women who live in residence and all women on campus to have free mammograms done”, Benedict said.

The team of Take Away Cancer who helped out at the shavathon today. Photo: Prelene Singh

The team of Take Away Cancer who helped out at the shavathon today. Photo: Prelene Singh

Photography exhibition illuminates the inner city

Earlier this year Gauteng City Region Observatory (GCRO) launched a photography competition, which ended with an exhibition of 62 of the most powerful photo’s received.

Entrants were asked to send through photographs of theirs which depicted their perceptions of the Gauteng City Region, said finalist and Witsie Thato Nkoane. Nkoane came in 4th place for her photo called ‘Johannesburg My City’, which was entered under the politics and governance sub topic.

“There were about 600 entries,” said Nkoane. The ecompetition was made open to students and staff af all university;s in the Gauteng region. The prizes offered were to the value of R15 000. Of wich Nkoane won R1000 and would like to use that money to buy herself a Lomography camera.

The final event came in the form of an exhibition at the FADA Gallery at UJ. There were over 250 people in attandance at the launch of the exhibition last week.

The judges were two photographers, Jodi Bieber and Roger Ballen. The third judge was Khwezi Gule who is the chief curator of the HectorPieterson Museum.

Potsiso Phasha, from GCRO said that “The exhibition, entitled ‘Portraits of a City-Region’, is an illustration of the Gauteng City-Region as a place we interact with with a strong ‘personality’ of its own and one with which we are constantly engaged in building relationships with.

GCRO ran the competition andexhibition in partnership with FADA Gallery at UJ. The GCRO is a partnership between the University of the Witwatersrand, the University of Johannesburg and Gauteng Provincial Government.

The top five winning images where taken by the following people (and appear below):

  1. Blaq Smith
  2. Jenna-Lee Ferrer
  3. Irene Lambrianos
  4. Thato Nkoane
  5. Martin Bolton
Winning photo, 'Sunday Morning' by UJ student Blaq Smith.

Winning photo, ‘Sunday Morning’ by UJ student Blaq Smith.

 

In second place, 'F-CK' by UJ student Jenna-Lee Ferrer.

In second place, ‘F-CK’ by UJ student Jenna-Lee Ferrer.

 

Third place went to Irene Lambrianos from the Design School South Africa. Her photography is titled 'City'.

Third place went to Irene Lambrianos from the Design School South Africa. Her photography is titled ‘City’.

 

in fourth place representing Wits, "My City" by Thato Nkoane.

In fourth place representing Wits, “My City” by Thato Nkoane.

 

in fifth place 'The Asphalt' by UJ winner, Martin Bolton.

In fifth place ‘The Asphalt’ by UJ winner, Martin Bolton.

 

Tough Run-In for FNB Wits Rugby

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HARD BALL: Captain of FNB Wits Devin Montgomery drives through FNB NWU-Pukke’s defensive line during their match at the Wits Rugby Stadium on Monday evening. Wits have not won a game since being promoted to the Varsity Cup. Photo Jay Caboz

Story and Photos by Jay Caboz

FNB Wits took a beating after FNB NWU-Pukke ran in a haul of 10 tries to, losing 71-25 on Monday nights Varsity Cup match held at the Wits Rugby Stadium.

Despite the overwhelming score line, Wits put up a good show and for the majority of the game were in running contention. But the visitors from North-West University tore through Wits defence in the second half with 5 unanswered tries leaving Wits in the dust and one try short of a salvaged bonus point.

“We were incredibly happy with our performance in the first half, we just have to learn to play for 80 minutes,” said Wits captain Devin Montgomery.

The score line opened a minute after the starting whistle when Wits flanker Thato Mavundla ran the ball over the line from a driving maul deep in Pukke’s half.

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TRIES FOR CHARITY: A fan waits for the kick-off between FNB Wits and FNB NWU-Pukke. The pink ball is a new introduction to this year’s Varsity Cup and allows players to add a R2 000 donation if they score for their team during the “Rugby that Rocks Time” period. Wits Rugby Club supports Usindiso Ministries, a shelter that offers support, assistance and care to teenage girls, abused women and their children. Photo Jay Caboz

The ball continued to roll in Wits’ favour after Carel Greeff broke through Pukke’s defensive line and put another try in.In the 15th minute Pukke shook off their shock and responded with a try of their own to bring the score to 16-5.
Pukke put another eight points on the board when SJ Niemand drove over the try line.

Wits were able to extend their lead by another two points after converting a long-ranged penalty to end the first quarter. The home team managed to extend their lead to 10 points when they scored what would be their last try of the match.

Play continued to swing in both halves with Wits making some crunching tackles. But Pukke gained some level footing after scoring another try to decrease the deficit. The final nail on the coffin was drawn when Pukke put in two more tries to end the half 31-25.

The second half remained a contest until 15 minutes in when the floodgates opened. Pukke ran in five more tries which completely overwhelmed Wits’ defence. The visitors size and field play was just too much for Wits to handle.

“Yes we took a beating, but a lot of the points we conceded were from mistakes on our own behalf and turning over the ball,” said Montgomery. “We have UJ [University of Johannesburg] next week and it’s a more familiar game to us than this week. We are looking forward to it.”

The result leaves Wits hanging in last place on the log, two points behind 7th Ikeys (UCT). Wits will need to put in a good performance against UJ, who are currently sitting 3rd, to draw some points ahead of their clashes with bottom of the log teams.

jay@witsvuvuzela.com

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I just don’t think it’s Hamlet

\’Hamlet\’ Choreographed by PJ Sabbagha/The Forgotten Angle Publicity photo shoot at Wits Theatre, Johannesburg. Photo: John Hogg

The first night of the 2011 Dance Umbrella saw PJ Sabbagha’s work, I think it’s Hamlet open at the Wits Theatre.

Winner of the Standard Bank award for dancer of the year, director Sabbagha described the work as “an essay on our personal responses and interaction with the original text through the lens of our contemporary experience as individuals and artists.”

The performance is inspired by, rather than based on, one of Shakespeare’s most famous tragedies. It is not a retelling of Shakespeare’s narrative but draws instead on Hamlet’s key themes and symbols, these being death, madness and revenge.

Performed by dancers from The Forgotten Angle Theatre Collaborative, the show literally started with a bang, with the firing of a starting gun signalling the beginning of the show.

I did often find myself wondering how dancers avoided crashing into each other, as they moved around the stage in a combination of lifts and tumbles showing their agility and stamina. They moved in a kind of unorganised precision with the fluidity that is certainly the result of hours of practice.

I recently watched Michael Flatley’s ‘Riverdance’ and was amazed by how the dancers all moved in precise unison. Sabbangha’s dancers very rarely performed identical steps and yet they moved with the same kind of synchronicity as their Irish dancing counterparts. Their movements were intricate and thoughtfully choreographed.

While admitting to being no expert on dance, there are often aspects of contemporary performances that require the kind of interpretation that eludes me. At one point two dancers came onto the stage and started chewing pieces of paper. The one then spat the chewed up pieces of paper in the other one’s face.  Why?

Later, in a complete change of lighting and mood, three male performers came out dressed in cabaret outfits and began interacting with the audience, prompted by one of their fellow cast members on a megaphone.

Guy Buttery melts hearts at the Wits Theatre

Guy Buttery, with only his guitar and an unassuming, easy-going attitude, transformed music into something more than just sound at the Wits theatre on Saturday night.

The audience could almost reach out and touch the notes he played. Through his energy and personality his message came across as clear as any motion picture.

Without words, Guy told a story that transcended all social boundaries. There is little doubt anyone left after the show without having experienced something deeply profound.

Guy has performed with legends like Nibs van der Spuy and Arno Carstens, as well as The Violent Femmes and Jethro Tull. Buttery has played in major festivals around the world but a spur-of-the-moment jam session in Morocco stands out for him.

He couldn’t speak their language, and the Moroccans couldn’t speak English but they played together anyway.

“It was [a] very humbling [experience] and I’ll never forget it.”

Buttery had an amazing 2010, winning numerous awards, including a South African Music Award for best instrumental record. He also signed a contract with one of the UK’s premier guitar-makers, Roger Bucknall.

However, Buttery says he will not put too much pressure on himself in 2011.

“I just like to take it day-by-day…If anything the success of last year has had a positive impact on my career”

Guy’s album “Fox Hill Lane” is out now.

Student au pairing and house-sitting jobs on the rise

Students advertising for house-sitting and au pairing jobs have increased on Wits campus as students seek out convenient ways of earning extra money.

House-sitting and au pairing  are popular with students, said Liam Patterson, a 2nd year architecture student. “They’re popular because it’s easy money and it doesn’t interfere with your personal time”.  He said the money earned from house-sitting can be up to R200 a day.

Many of the advertisements around main campus are placed by Sheli Berger, who organises au pairing and house-sitting through her company. “It’s extremely popular with my clients,” she says. According to Berger, there is a demand for house-sitters and au pairs all year round, but particularly during the holiday period.

Students also advertise to be au pairs on websites such as Gumtree. Amy Bruss, a 3rd year student at Wits, said she advertised on Gumtree and found it reliable. She says au pairing among students is popular, “because most people end (class) in the afternoon, and it’s around the time that kids finish school, so the timetables work out nicely.”

The BA student says she took care of two children and earned about R2 000 a month. Tutoring is also a way in which students earn extra money. “I needed a bit of money and for an hourly pay, it’s quite a lot,” says Kirsten Watt, a psychology honours student. Watt says that tutoring is also popular with students.

Whether students advertise for themselves or go through agencies, they have to go for an interview and a screening process. A well-known au pair agency said that they interview students between the ages of 18- 25 and have a strict screening process. However, some families still preferred older au pairs, the agency said.