OUR HANDS ARE CLEAN: After taking the polygraph test and being cleansed, Zahraa Khaki and Miriam Hookey posed for a picture, to show their support for the fight against corruption. Photo: Boipelo Boikhutso

OUR HANDS ARE CLEAN: After taking the polygraph test and being cleansed, Zahraa Khaki and Miriam Hookey show their support for the fight against corruption at an exhibition held on the Wits Library lawns today. Photo: Boipelo Boikhutso

The Unite Against Corruption campaign uses a series of fun tests to raise awareness about corruption. This week, the campaign came to Wits University.

Witsies took the ultimate test on Tuesday as they were subjected to a polygraph machine and a sangoma. The students participated in the Unite Against Corruption (UAC) interactive exhibit held on the Wits Library Lawns and took the polygraph test before getting their hands washed by the traditional healer.

Using what was called a “digital cleanser” that consisted of a “modern sangoma” cleansing students of corruption, the recently-formed coalition along with Corruption Watch, also ran a lie-detector test using a polygraph machine.

Students were encouraged to speak out against corruption. Miriam Hookey, first year General BA, took the test because she was curious about the testing process.

“Corruption is plaguing our country, we need to make South Africa better,” Hookey said.

Tina Power, the chairperson of Students for Law and Social Justice, and one of the UAC campaigners, told Wits Vuvuzela that the idea behind the polygraph machine test, was to “show that our hands are clean”.

The machine was custom-set for the event as a lie-detection process normally takes 90 minutes.

The UAC will be hosting a number of public marches against corruption in the coming weeks with one in Pretoria and another in Cape Town.